Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books with 135 Pages

Reviews of Books with 135 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 135 pages.

Book Review

Dead Man’s Float

by Matt Sutherland

The fix is in: we are hopeless Jim Harrison fans, and his recent death moved our reverence beyond reason—he alone spoke our Mother Tongue. In a forty-plus year career, Harrison authored thirty-six books, most of them collections of... Read More

Book Review

100 Chinese Silences

by Matt Sutherland

All nature of tired, absurd stereotypes of China and her people maintain a hold on the minds of most Americans, even as China’s superpower ascendancy has dominated headlines for some twenty-five years. With weaponized pen, Timothy Yu... Read More

Book Review

Quick Kills

by Julia Ann Charpentier

Rock-bottom self-esteem, along with a desire to please, reaches a treacherous psychological cliff in Lurie’s frighteningly realistic novella. Art and pornography vie for prominence in this ultrasophisticated yet sordid take on fashion... Read More

Book Review

Feelings Poetry

by Melissa Wuske

In "Feelings Poetry", Gary McLauchlan attempts to capture and convey the deep emotions of his heart. McLauchlan’s more than sixty poems cover a wide variety of topics from family, prayer, teddy bears, the news, bullying, and natural... Read More

Book Review

North Northeast

by Lisa Bower

Rennie McQuilkin does what many writers must wish for: he takes one of his early books and re-imagines it. An accomplished poet, McQuilkin is the author of nine collections, including An Astonishment and an Hissing and We All Fall Down.... Read More

Book Review

The Rock Holler Gang

by Johanna Massé

Take one ten-year-old budding detective with an inquiring mind and place her in a small town with secrets to spare and you have a mystery story appropriate for elementary— and middle-school—aged children. A year after her mother... Read More

Book Review

The Dust of Life

by Elizabeth Millard

A former Marine who fought in Vietnam in the late 1960s, McKelvey fell in love with his so-called enemy. Rather than just serve his tour of duty and return home in relief, he instead became fascinated by the people, the culture and the... Read More

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