Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books with 368 Pages

Reviews of Books with 368 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 368 pages.

Book Review

Southern Sass and Killer Cravings

by Karen Rigby

In Kate Young’s cozy mystery, energetic Marygene, a soon-to-be divorcée, returns to her family’s diner to save her sister, Jena Lynn, who’s been accused of murder after a customer dropped dead. "Southern Sass and Killer Cravings"... Read More

Book Review

Among the Lost

by Rebecca Hussey

Emiliano Monge’s "Among the Lost" is a harrowing novel about migration and human trafficking, told from the points of view of both victims and victimizers. Set in an unnamed country that resembles Mexico and taking place over the... Read More

Book Review

Blood, Oil and the Axis

by Jeff Fleischer

By the spring of 1941, the Axis powers were in ascendance, with France and Russia on their heels, the United States still officially neutral, and the United Kingdom and its colonies representing the last hope for stopping Nazi domination... Read More

Book Review

The Dictionary Wars

by Meagan Logsdon

Nationalism and patriotism are not unfamiliar substances in America’s bloodstream. As Peter Martin’s "The Dictionary Wars" illustrates, such fervor extended into heated debates over English language usage. In its infancy, the United... Read More

Book Review

The Last Caliph

by Delia Stanley

"The Last Caliph" is a thoughtful thriller whose cast is illuminating in its diversity. T. L. Williams’s "The Last Caliph" is a realistic military adventure that reveals the intricacies of American involvement in the Middle East. Logan... Read More

Book Review

Cogheart

by Catherine Thureson

In Peter Bunzl’s enthralling middle grade adventure, "Cogheart", Lily Hartman’s inventor father is missing, and she sets off to solve the mystery of his disappearance. The story moves quickly, its complex plot never missing a step.... Read More

Book Review

The Zinoviev Letter

by Rachel Jagareski

Intelligence historian Gill Bennett’s easy familiarity with Anglo-Soviet foreign policy and espionage imbues "The Zinoviev Letter" with impressive authoritativeness, untangling the 1924 “fake news” document from speculation to... Read More

Book Review

As a City on a Hill

by Rachel Jagareski

Daniel T. Rodgers eloquently decodes four centuries of Western history in "As a City on a Hill", in which myths and meanings of Massachusetts Bay Colony governor John Winthrop’s 1630 “A Model of Christian Charity” are elegantly... Read More

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