Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books with 368 Pages

Reviews of Books with 368 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 368 pages.

Book Review

The Moonstoners

by Mari Carlson

Barbara J. Dzikowski’s "The Moonstoners" explores love in unsettled, complicated times. The Trudeau, Ziemny, and Chavis families first collide when Noel Trudeau meets Ricky Ziemny after art class. While Theckla and Freddie Chavis care... Read More

Book Review

The Lady in the Coppergate Tower

by Shana Creaney

Nancy Campbell Allen’s steampunk romance "The Lady in the Coppergate Tower" is a fantasy-laden Victorian era tale whose fascinating world is filled with drama and adventure. In high society London, working class Hazel works and pines... Read More

Book Review

Gumshoe Rock

by Claire Foster

Rob Leininger’s "Gumshoe Rock" is a gritty one-two punch of a PI mystery that tracks Mortimer Angel through a tense, gruesome investigation in Reno. Mort is everything a private investigator should be: grim, grizzled, old enough to... Read More

Book Review

Southern Sass and Killer Cravings

by Karen Rigby

In Kate Young’s cozy mystery, energetic Marygene, a soon-to-be divorcée, returns to her family’s diner to save her sister, Jena Lynn, who’s been accused of murder after a customer dropped dead. "Southern Sass and Killer Cravings"... Read More

Book Review

Among the Lost

by Rebecca Hussey

Emiliano Monge’s "Among the Lost" is a harrowing novel about migration and human trafficking, told from the points of view of both victims and victimizers. Set in an unnamed country that resembles Mexico and taking place over the... Read More

Book Review

Blood, Oil and the Axis

by Jeff Fleischer

By the spring of 1941, the Axis powers were in ascendance, with France and Russia on their heels, the United States still officially neutral, and the United Kingdom and its colonies representing the last hope for stopping Nazi domination... Read More

Book Review

The Dictionary Wars

by Meagan Logsdon

Nationalism and patriotism are not unfamiliar substances in America’s bloodstream. As Peter Martin’s "The Dictionary Wars" illustrates, such fervor extended into heated debates over English language usage. In its infancy, the United... Read More

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