Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books with 400 Pages

Reviews of Books with 400 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 400 pages.

Book Review

The Seed Keeper

by Danielle Ballantyne

Told through the voices of strong, albeit fractured, women across generations, "The Seed Keeper" is a novel about legacies, generational trauma, and the inescapable call of one’s roots. Rosalie’s mother died when she was four. She... Read More

Book Review

Phoenix Flame

by Eileen Gonzalez

A teenage girl fights to save her family and an entire realm in Sara Holland’s young adult fantasy novel, "Phoenix Flame". Maddie always thought that the inhabitants of Solaria were an evil, dangerous race. Now that she knows the... Read More

Book Review

Caught!

by Edith Wairimu

"Caught!" is the inspiring biography of a fisheries overseer who faced barriers to his conservationist efforts. "Caught!" is Joel B. Kerr’s illuminating biography of Canadian fisheries overseer John W. Kerr. John W. Kerr was born in... Read More

Book Review

To Calais, In Ordinary Time

by Kristine Morris

"To Calais, In Ordinary Time" is a brilliant novel set in medieval times. In it, a group of travelers races against the Black Death on a journey that leads each to an unexpected destination. In 1348, as the Black Death sweeps into... Read More

Book Review

Love Is a Revolution

by Aimee Jodoin

Renée Watson’s "Love Is a Revolution" is a story of summer love, family bonds, Black girl empowerment, and loving who you are. Nala wants the summer before her senior year to be special. She wants to find a gorgeous new hairstyle. She... Read More

Book Review

A Man of Colours

by Edith Wairimu

Historical and religious intrigues combine in "A Man of Colours", a thriller in which the Knights Templar confront prophecies about world events. Religious groups struggle to gain possession of an ancient scroll whose contents could... Read More

Book Review

Bedeviled

by Kristen Rabe

Jimena Canales’s captivating popular science text "Bedeviled" concerns the conceptual “demons” that drive scientific innovation. While scientists reject notions of demons in religions and superstition, Canales says, they also... Read More

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