Foreword Reviews

Wicked Weeds

A Zombie Novel

2016 INDIES Winner
Silver, Science Fiction (Adult Fiction)

Horror-film buffs will appreciate the irony and impressive knowledge the zombie possesses of pop-culture representations of the living dead through the years.

Threats of a zombie apocalypse seem to be around every corner, but what’s rare is an intelligent, thoughtful, funny, sentimental, socially conscious, and, yes, gross at times zombie tale infused with Caribbean culture, piques, prejudices, and passions. Pedro Cabiya delivers all of this and more in Wicked Weeds, one gentleman zombie’s quest to recapture his lost qualia, that indefinable, internal, sensory perception of self.

With all the edgy, philosophical musings characteristic of Latin American fiction, the progression of Wicked Weeds unfolds over generations and across the complicated social strata of Haitians and Dominicans. Three distinct voices are at play: the scientist zombie, the beautiful and cunning fellow scientist Isadore Bellamy, and her great-aunt Sandine, who hails from a black-magic-steeped village in Haiti.

Through field reports, journal entries, reminiscences, and even a few police interrogation reports, the zombie’s roots and expectations carefully emerge as he attempts to blend into a society unaccepting of his living-dead status. After all, “to be dead,” observes a wise zombie, “has grievous consequences.” Humorous, introspective, and often both at once, the zombie clumsily fields amorous pursuits while pursuing his search for qualia, surprisingly overlapping Isadore’s own forays into the botany of dangerous plants, or “wicked weeds.”

Horror-film buffs will appreciate the irony and impressive knowledge the zombie possesses of pop-culture representations of the living dead through the years, which were studied purely for self-preservation but prove insightful nonetheless. That knowledge integrates decades of science-fiction representations and icons.

Whether you consider yourself a lover of zombie fantasies or not, devour Wicked Weeds for its unique perspective, cultural insights, and charged humor. Go ahead and laugh out loud or clear your throat in surprise because, as every zombie knows, “when all is said and done,” a laugh and a cough are each just a “spasm of the thorax.”

Reviewed by Pallas Gates McCorquodale

Disclosure: This article is not an endorsement, but a review. The author of this book provided free copies of the book to have their book reviewed by a professional reviewer. No fee was paid by the author for this review. Foreword Reviews only recommends books that we love. Foreword Magazine, Inc. is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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