Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books with 92 Pages

Reviews of Books with 92 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 92 pages.

Book Review

Love, Time Is Gone

by Letitia Montgomery-Rodgers

A passion project targeted at a particular woman, "Love, Time Is Gone" features high-flown language, lambent rage, and nearly mythic stakes. Dedicated to a woman named April, Joseph Bartley Haltom III’s "Love, Time Is Gone" is a deeply... Read More

Book Review

Barefoot

by Matt Sutherland

A professor in the religious studies department at the University of Virginia, Kevin Hart’s Christianity is ever present even as he writes passionately of young love, titillation, and “thin girls who taste of Beaujolais at night.”... Read More

Book Review

Girl with Death Mask

by Matt Sutherland

When cornered, we’ll admit to preferring poetry with rhythm—musicality in the ear surely deepens a poem’s effect. Yes, Jennifer Givhan, we’re awed by your use of pause and pacing, as you lead us to better understanding a... Read More

Book Review

The Middle Ages

by Matt Sutherland

Poets and words, a relationship built on endless frustration and betrayal. That’s not what I intended to say. Sorry, bard, that’s what you get with me. Certain poets embrace the ambiguity, as if potential misunderstandings raise a... Read More

Book Review

Trophic Cascade

by Matt Sutherland

Tension. Simmering. —Beneath her matter-of-fact, easy-going, sit-yourself-down, let-me-tell-it-like-it-is chatifying. And her power we take deadly seriously. Camille T. Dungy is a Fort Collins, Colorado, essayist and author of three... Read More

Book Review

Zarg

by Lisa Butts

A sense of fun and musical exuberance permeates these poems about embracing “the now.” In "Zarg", the collected poems of Sam Muldoon, the poet explores themes of spirituality, mindfulness, antimaterialism, and romantic love in verses... Read More

Book Review

Wonderland

by Jacquelyn Lazo

Ligon’s poignant compilation mirrors fundamental truths about human desire and defeat. “Something broke in me for good, some brittle thing I didn’t know was there,” writes Samuel Ligon in his new collection, "Wonderland", “and... Read More

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