Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books with 147 Pages

Reviews of Books with 147 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 147 pages.

Book Review

Tattoo

by Letitia Montgomery-Rodgers

A hospitalized girl is roused from a coma, waking to a world where Judgment Day has come and gone. Michelle Rene’s "Tattoo", a novella from a press specializing in the form, juxtaposes postapocalypse with rebirth as old forces revisit... Read More

Book Review

Bibliodeath

by Elizabeth Millard

The unceasing pace of technology is creating a “bibliodeath” in which the written word is heading toward loss, some potential mourners believe. But that doomsday view ignores the evolutionary relationship between technology and... Read More

Book Review

Saving Rachel

Sam Case, the suave and self-important narrator of "Saving Rachel", thinks he has all he could ask for. He has a devoted wife on one hand and a secret mistress on the side. He makes ridiculous amounts of money as a software engineer... Read More

Book Review

Unschooling Kelly

“The system will not tolerate the truth. Fail a student and you have administrators and parents jumping down your throat” Mr. Cordray tells his protégée. “If they fail it is your fault. You didn’t try hard enough didn’t give... Read More

Book Review

Playing With Fire

"Playing With Fire" is an informal comedic look at the very serious condition of sex addiction definitely too explicit for the youngsters. This chronicle of successive passions owes a debt to the venerable Penthouse letters—those... Read More

Book Review

Order in the House

by Holly Chase Williams

You fell in love. You got married. Now what? If you’re a Christian then God might be waiting for what He wants for your marriage—for you to establish His order in your house. In this thoughtful compassionate volume Nelson encourages... Read More

Book Review

Grave Goods

by Gabrielle Shaw

“Those who return from these darkling territories bring with them messages. These messages are poetry. Let the interpretation begin.” With these words O’Grady suggests that the “vision of the inaccessible” is a sacred and... Read More