ForeWord Reviews

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Singapore and Asia

Celebrating Globalization and an Emerging Postmodern Asian Civilization

Clarion Review (5 Stars)

Singapore and Asia: Celebrating Globalization and an Emerging Postmodern Asian Civilization by TK TI and Edward SW TI is an insightful and educational look into the economic history, growth, and expansion of Singapore.

Singapore and Asia explores Singapore’s emerging presence in the global economy and the rise of Asia’s postmodern economy. The authors begin by describing in great detail the workings of today’s global economy and its influences, such as the threat of climate change. They provide a careful survey of the world’s economic history and the background of the global forces that set the stage for Singapore’s current success.

The preface provides readers with a clear understanding of the authors’ knowledge of and background in the material, laying a strong foundation for the rest of the book. Born in Singapore, the authors have extensive experience studying and experiencing the country’s economy and history. The book is enhanced by a clean format and an accessible layout. The well-placed chapter breaks and subheadings increase the book’s readability. Smooth transitions lead readers logically from one section or topic to another without awkwardness. The writing style draws readers into the subject:

“The ‘little red dot’ of a budding nation is not easily located on a world map. All of 710 sq km (131 sq km reclaimed from the sea) is home and hope for a cosmopolitan population in 2009 of 4,987,600, of which 3,733900 are citizens and permanent residents. Three in ten of the workforces are temporary migrant workers.”

The authors captivate the readers and whisk them along with well-chosen language. And they have included the occasional poem to provide some relief from the facts and figures. For example, a poem called “All Things Pass” is included immediately before the beginning of the book’s second section. The inclusion of poetry aids transitions between the sections and lightens the book’s scholarly tone.

Helpful summaries appear at the beginning of each chapter. Statistics and data are generously included, increasing the credibility of the authors. For instance, the authors note, “GDP in 2000 was twenty-four times its level in 1960. The average annual growth rate for the real gross domestic product (GDP) from 1960 to 2000 was 8.5 per cent.”

Singapore and Asia is a fascinating look at the economy of Singapore and its role in the emerging global economy.

Emily Adams