ForeWord Reviews

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Sell Your Home with Feng Shui

A Complete Guide to Staging Homes for Quick Sale in Any Market

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

This book utilizes its own good advice and presents itself in its best light beginning with the clear colorful photography and tasteful red-hued cover. Its compact size fits easily in the hand and with only 87 pages it does not overwhelm with too much detail. Inside the abundant use of bright engaging photography balance of white space type size and use of colored-boxed special tips enhances and reinforces the information presented in a friendly concise upbeat style. The book progresses in an organized easy-to-follow path from curb appeal through each room including an empty house and difficult to sell properties ending with a quick reference guide.

For anyone preparing to sell a home particularly real estate professionals this book provides valuable information concerning how to present a most appealing property. By hooking these suggestions to Feng Shui the authors may limit the audience who would benefit from their sage advice. Their suggestions boil down to good-old-fashioned marketing strategies that savvy realtors and homeowners have utilized effectively for years.

Most of this information reflects basic common sense. When discussing curb appeal the authors suggest “Trim back overgrown bushes or overhanging trees that obscure the path or block the view…” When staging your house for potential buyers “declutter.” And they caution “You are telling the buyer that the house is too small or inadequate when you represent this room as anything but the master bedroom”.

Perhaps one aspect not normally addressed by realtors would be rehabilitation of bad reputations in Chapter 8. If someone died divorced or had misfortune in the property the authors suggest calling in a “Feng Shui consultant to do a space clearing in the home.”

Overall the authors have brought together information that anyone selling a home would find beneficial. A realtor might do well to provide this book for his or her associates as a reference guide when preparing a new property for sale. But as a business minded realtor advocating Feng Shui may be less appealing than a straight-forward approach to marketing. Many books are available on marketing real estate often published by the realtor’s company. They provide similar advice without asking the reader to embrace Feng Shui. If the target audience were non-professionals with a Feng Shui affinity this might be well received.

Dawn Goldsmith