ForeWord Reviews

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Prevention is Difficult

But Possible

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

Allen J. Orehek is a doctor of internal medicine and pediatrics with over sixteen years of experience. He is the founder of the Medical Prevention Center™ and Dementia Prevention Center™ and has applied years of intensive research and study into developing a new paradigm for empowering individuals and their medical professionals.

Orehek asserts in this groundbreaking book that it is logical, compassionate, and efficacious for medical professionals to perform exploratory tests to catch conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, cancers, and stroke in their infancy. Doing so allows doctors to help patients apply preventative measures before symptoms ever develop.

The book has twenty-one comprehensive chapters and ten pages of well-organized notes at the end. Prevention is Difficult-But Possible opens with an impassioned introduction followed by several tone-setting chapters that do an excellent job of preparing the reader for Orehek’s distinctive delivery style. He writes well and does a good job of explaining the science behind his theories in a conversational manner.

Much of the volume’s content is focused on what the contemporary medical establishment and insurance industry do wrong, as well as the background behind why this is the case. Orehek vehemently asserts, time and again (almost to the point of overkill), that the system is broken and that medical consumers must take the initiative in demanding preventative tests. He writes, “When can the doctor be ‘the doctor’ and tell you what you need, not what your insurance will cover or pay for? This is the root of the current state of psychological abandonment of your health care team.”

Orehek dedicates nine chapters to specific diseases or groups of diseases, and to the tests available to discern whether one has the potential for acquiring these diseases in the future. He also devotes a considerable amount of copy to evaluating the true cost of conventional health care from the perspective of “pain and suffering.” This emotionally charged, manifesto-like thread woven through the text is invaluable and eye-opening, and could forever shift how one approaches his or her health and medical care.

There are several minor caveats to an unequivocal endorsement of this exceptional book. The title is odd, and there is an abundance of redundancies throughout the volume. In addition, the font is oversized, and some of the illustrations appear both amateurish and confusing. Fortunately, none of these issues truly detract from the quality of the content.

Prevention is Difficult-But Possible is a book that every medical consumer and medical provider should read. For those determined to live until one hundred, the hundred-year-old wanting to live another decade, and the medical doctor seeking ways to help patients reach their goals, Orehek’s seminal work is recommended.

Patty Sutherland