Foreword Reviews

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  2. Books with 230 Pages

Reviews of Books with 230 Pages

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that have 230 pages.

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Book Review

A Solitary Awakening

by Brittney Decker

"A Solitary Awakening" is a feverish orchestration of mystery, violence, poetry, and even love. Kevin Cady’s gory psychological thriller "A Solitary Awakening" recounts the terrifying pursuit of a mastermind killer. FBI agents Elijah... Read More

Book Review

Invention

by Billie Rae Bates

It’s practical teaching, biblically based, and relatable for anybody. The subtitle on Justin Camp’s "Invention" may seem a little contrary at first: breaking free from a “culture hell bent on holding you back” would mean you... Read More

Book Review

Making Local Food Work

by Anna Call

In the age of the locavore, Janssen’s text examines the movement from the perspective of the farmer, combining research with incisive, yet practical, analysis. The book begins with a straightforward explanation of the author’s... Read More

Book Review

Seeking Alice

by Christine Canfield

This novel blends a deeply emotional story with an environment that is captivating in its danger and complexity. In Camilla Trinchieri’s "Seeking Alice", World War II is a force that makes it difficult for families to stay together.... Read More

Book Review

Risuko

by Stephanie Bucklin

A century of civil war has devastated Japan, but Kano Murasaki has grown up far from the conflicts and battles that rage in the nation. Nicknamed “Squirrel,” or Risuko, all the young girl wants to do is climb trees as she grows up in... Read More

Book Review

A Broken Sausage Grinder

by John Senger

This discourse on the United States’ flawed political system is clear, concise, well organized, and engagingly written. In an office of the United States House of Representatives, there was a sign that said: “Law and sausage are... Read More

Book Review

Bring Me the Head of Yorkie Goodman

by Anna Call

Alongside a portrayal of mobsters clinging desperately to their masculinity, Yates reveals the nonsense of violence and revenge. The assassins: two hit men from North Carolina. The target: a Hoosier farmer named Yorkie Goodman. The... Read More

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