Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Architecture

Book Review

Feminist City

by Tanisha Rule

In "Feminist City", Leslie Kern shows how cities keep women “in their place” through hidden, understated means while favoring men’s needs and experiences. Wide-ranging urban plans often come together to influence how women move... Read More

Book Review

Model City

by Matt Sutherland

North Korea fascinates a world bored with so many bland, decent-enough democracies. Cowered by the tubby tyrant Kim Jong-un, the nation’s 25 million citizens struggle to make do in a system that’s so handcuffed by sanctions, so... Read More

Book Review

Crestwood Hills

by Christine Canfield

Brimming with beautiful photographs and renderings, this book is a visual journey as much as a historic record of this community. World War II was over. California had an abundance of jobs for returning vets and a beautiful climate. What... Read More

Book Review

Sacred Space

by Karen Rigby

For home design enthusiasts, the book provides inspiration and brings poetry to the communal act of building. "Sacred Space" celebrates Pine Hollow, an expansive retreat inspired by the Lake Michigan shoreline. Leslie Lee, who founded... Read More

Book Review

Bay Bridge

by Kai White

Bay Bridge architect uses his intimate knowledge to detail the technical, political, and geographical hurdles involved in construction of the historic span. Author and illustrator Donald MacDonald evokes all the mythic splendor and... Read More

Book Review

Building Taliesin

by Julie Eakin

Ron McCrea’s Building Taliesin: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home of Love and Loss covers the years from 1910 through 1914, the period during which the architect conceived and built his masterpiece in the hills of Wisconsin, accompanied by... Read More

Book Review

Fallingwater

by Julie Eakin

“Seventy-five years after its inception, Fallingwater affirms architecture’s prospect to engage the lyrical and visceral dimensions of human experience that arise from a direct engagement with nature.” So writes John M. Reynolds in... Read More

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