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Choosing Honor

An American Woman's Search for God, Family, and Country in an Age of Corruption

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

“I imagine a world without war a world without hate…and I imagine us attacking that world because they’d never expect it.”—Jack Handey from Deep Thoughts (1992)

Handey is joking (we hope) but watch out for a group of sinister economic controllers who would file that quip away as a sound strategy. The conspiring bankers politicians and billionaires labeled collectively here as “Money Power” command one of the two diametrically opposed worldviews outlined in Choosing Honor. Their manipulation of financial markets comes from a black magic mindset stretched over a core endorsement of old fashioned Social Darwinism (survival of the fittest/might makes right). “Money Power” controls nations brainwashing the masses to act contrary to their own interests. They purposefully create wars and manipulate the economy to bullish booms or recessions. Even the Great Depression was caused and sustained by willful effort.

Ficalora traces Money Power’s roots to extraordinary Civil War spending emphasizing the creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913 as the coup de gr&226;ce. The rogues gallery features the Trilateral Commission the Council on Foreign Relations Brown Brothers as well as the Harrimans Bushes and Rockefellers; the latter are accused of infusing cash into the Women’s Liberation movement in service of an ulterior purpose. Some claims and statements aren’t readily provable or disprovable though the overall argument gains tensile strength from excellent outside source material.

Practitioners of white magic (survival of all/right makes might) are potential messiahs. John Lennon was one and plenty of regular people are also. The author urges close attentiveness and above all gathering the courage to do what’s best for the future: “Honor is standing for the good of all in the face of forces that are beyond our control. Honor requires us to stand up in spite of our fear.”

Chapters named for popular song titles of the sixties through eighties revolve around the Absolutes of the Kabbalah’s Tree of Life. Absolutes are linked to specific parallels found in the United States Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. Components of Eastern religions tied in include meditation and the responsibility of right livelihood. “The Light” almost synonymous with the Way of Taoism is actually compared to the Jedi Force. Luke Skywalker triumphs by using both halves of The Light.

Ficalora solidly favors a return to the Gold Standard backing money tangibly to reduce its vulnerability to manipulation. She’s a former corporatist Republican who turned Democrat out of disgust at the Reagan Administration’s illegal wars; a twist of Libertarianism keeps her from lock-stepping with any given party line. After working in film and television production the author took up a self-guided study at the Philosophical Research Society in Los Angeles.

Choosing Honor is thoroughly southern Californian in tone but potential readers who dismiss it on that basis cheat themselves of a provocatively framed well-organized argument supporting the greater good to the greater number. This book calls for forgiveness of debtor nations abolition of the Fed and a big dose of moral bravery. Differences between worldviews couldn’t be more precisely delineated.