Foreword Reviews

  1. Book Reviews
  2. Books Available for $15.95

Reviews of Books Priced $15.95

Here are all of the books we've reviewed that are available for $15.95.

Book Review

Winterkill

by Ho Lin

In Ragnar Jónasson’s "Winterkill", the latest entry in his Dark Iceland series, Detective Ari Thór Arason has just been promoted to inspector in Siglufjörður. He’s anxious about the approaching Easter weekend visit from his... Read More

Book Review

Imminent Threat

by John M. Murray

In Jeff Gunhus’s bombastic thriller "Imminent Threat", an old threat rises to cleanse the world in fire; only the Alpha Team might be able to thwart him. Jacobslav Scarvan, a KGB assassin and a ruthless terrorist, finds himself aboard... Read More

Book Review

Weekend Pass

by Jeff Fleischer

In Paul Cavanagh’s novel "Weekend Pass", a patient takes leave from a drug treatment facility to try to repair the damage done to her family. Tasha’s story is gradually revealed via details about her relationships with her family... Read More

Book Review

To the Mountain

by John M. Murray

In Erik Raschke’s lean, taut novel "To the Mountain", a father races to find his lost autistic son during a blizzard. In a remote juvenile center in Colorado, twelve-year-old Marshall endures bullying, overzealous staff members, and... Read More

Book Review

No Planet B

by Rachel Jagareski

If you haven’t read Teen Vogue lately, you might be surprised to learn that pieces about climate change are among its fashion and pop culture pages. Editor Lucy Diavolo collects thirty-one of these impassioned articles and interviews... Read More

Book Review

Cold Moon

by Matt Sutherland

Every author launches their book into the world with a prayer. Please, powers that be, let this humble collection of words make teenaged girls laugh uncontrollably, or provoke men to schedule a prostate exam, as the case may be. Some... Read More

Book Review

Altar for Broken Things

by Matt Sutherland

Acorns, crows, lightning, and sand dollars; crickets and physics and neon-red dyed turkey feather headdresses. Such things deserve attention, but in their plain familiarity, frighten the likes of lesser poets. Deborah A. Miranda sees the... Read More

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