ForeWord Reviews

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The Heart of Money

A Couple's Guide to Creating True Financial Intimacy

Foreword Review — Winter 2013

Deborah Price’s The Heart of Money is a book that aims to teach couples how to achieve a level of comfort dealing with financial matters—but it goes much deeper than that. Price, who founded the Money Coaching Institute and counsels individuals, couples, and businesses about money concerns, makes it clear that “money issues are merely a symptom of another problem.”

Price immediately puts the reader at ease by relating the story of her own childhood experiences in a family that always lacked money. “Having witnessed so much financial struggle in my parents’ lives has deeply influenced my own life and choices,” writes the author. She suggests that sharing each other’s “money stories” will help a couple create “financial intimacy.”

Price leads the reader through a personal discovery that includes how one’s money story affects one’s attitude toward money, how to identify one’s “money type,” how to communicate about money, how to identify common “money traps,” ways to overcome financial setbacks, how to discuss money with children, and more. In each chapter, Price carefully and clearly explains how money has an impact on relationships. She includes examples of couples facing financial issues, along with numerous helpful exercises, several of which delve into the basis of a loving relationship. Why? Because, writes Price, “the better the energy and glow between two people, the easier it is to attract and maintain a healthy relationship, personally and financially.”

The author’s advice regarding debt is particularly helpful. She suggests that, rather than feeling victimized, couples should remain calm, “release the past,” and find ways to support one another and deal directly with the debt. She includes a helpful tool, a “Summary of Monthly Cash Flow—Spending Plan,” so couples can understand and analyze their income and expenses with an eye toward improvement.

Price closes the book with a chapter that encourages couples to work collaboratively to envision a “rich life” together. While this invariably involves money, it also encompasses common dreams, desires, and goals. The author provides guidance so a couple can develop a collective purpose, determine their specific intentions, and move forward together.

Deborah Price’s book is sensitive, compassionate, instructive, and well written. Couples who read it together and take it seriously will surely gain a new appreciation for the role money plays in their lives; in fact, The Heart of Money is likely to help couples forge a more loving, intimate relationship.

Barry Silverstein