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Julie Eakin, Book Reviewer

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Book Review

Detox Your World

by Julie Eakin

Okay, so the book’s cover may look like a scene out of a Pink Panther movie from the ‘70s—a curvy blonde offering us a cocktail (which happens to be green)—but there’s nothing funny about the content of "Detox Your World". In... Read More

Book Review

Kehinde Wiley

by Julie Eakin

As with most great art, Kehinde Wiley’s portraits reflect the time and place in which they were created: in this case, current-day cities. They also comment on the history of portraiture, specifically upending traditional European... Read More

Book Review

My Amazing Average Dog

by Julie Eakin

Part journal, part traditional book, My “Amazing“ Average Dog invites its readers—the target audience is tweens who already have a dog or want a dog—to participate in its making by asking a series of irresistible questions. The... Read More

Book Review

The Great Picture

by Julie Eakin

The presentation of this material alone merits a review. With an appropriate landscape (horizontal) format, and slip-cased in a tight-fitting, black-on-black embossed sleeve featuring the camera’s outlandish dimensions, the very act of... Read More

Book Review

Robert R. Taylor and Tuskegee

by Julie Eakin

As the architect of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute from 1892 to 1932, Robert Taylor, the nation’s first professionally educated African American architect, was charged with realizing buildings that would lend a unifying... Read More

Book Review

Memory Remains

by Julie Eakin

Before it became the repository for fifteen hundred artifacts from Ground Zero for nearly ten years, Hangar 17 was an empty airplane warehouse, a remote, 80,000-square-foot building at New York City’s Kennedy airport. Through Spanish... Read More

Book Review

Missed Connections

by Julie Eakin

Love at first sight? It’s never out of fashion, according to this collection of lovely, quirky drawings recording many such hopeful moments. Celebrated are mostly young strangers in and around New York City, whose paths crossed or even... Read More

Book Review

The History of Rome in Painting

by Julie Eakin

Discovered by Romulus in 753 B.C., a village of shepherds that would eventually become the Eternal City was initially understood as an abstract concept and a symbolic image rather than a real place, according to this fine book. By 70... Read More

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