ForeWord Reviews

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Nine Easy Steps to Complete Health and Wellbeing

A Physician's Guide to Health, Happiness, and Vitality

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

For more than thirty years Dr. Bindya Singh has researched the fields of health and wellness—mental physical and spiritual. From this wellspring of knowledge and experience she has distilled a “best practices” approach for “a recipe for complete well-being that will allow one to feel well perform well and look well.” To achieve these goals she advises readers to follow a three-dimensional approach of “determination discipline and devotion” in adhering to the nine easy steps she outlines here. Singh’s analogy of her book as a recipe is a good one since it is filled with tables charts lists of things to do and things to avoid activities to measure and record and tips from “the teachings of great men and women.” And although she stresses that maximum benefit will accrue from her book through integrating all of the individual steps for the betterment of the mind body and soul readers can easily pick and choose the parts they wish to concentrate on.

Singh writes clearly and concisely using appropriate anecdotes at the appropriate time and citing authorities from the omniscient “Anonymous” to her father Mother Theresa poets philosophers and proverbs. She finds folk wisdom in homilies such as “In order to change we must be sick and tired of being sick and tired” or in her father’s words “a problem is not the problem; not finding a solution is the problem.”

Her well-organized easily read volume is divided into two parts. In part one sections called “Mind” “Body” and “Soul” are subdivided into chapters including “Right Attitude” “Stress-free Mind” “Vital Nutrition” and “Rejuvenating Rest.” For each of these topics Singh then provides specific guidelines. In part two she lists her nine easy steps for ultimate health and the steps toward achieving them.

Singh touches upon such topics as using protein supplements dealing with toxins and the benefits of yoga and meditation. She discusses the strength of the soul the need to be in harmony with nature and the benefits of associating with positive thinkers. She includes sample meal menus and a schedule for taking vitamins and supplements complements her discussions about nutrition. A bibliography for additional reading is also included. But while her book has something for everybody she stresses that her recipe for health and well-being ultimately depends on the reader’s willingness to take responsibility for his or her own life. She suggests adopting the mantra of “Attitude Attitude Attitude” and remembering the saying “Think you can think you can’t; either way you will be right.”

Reading this book is a tenth step in Dr. Singh’s recipe to wellness for the mind body and soul.

M. Wayne Cunningham