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2nd Revolution of our Founding Fathers' Noble Vision

Reconstruct Mature Responsible Society

Clarion Review (2 Stars)

“Man is like the musk deer unaware of the mighty power within himself” psychologist Dr. [Salim] Shah writes in The 2nd Revolution of our Founding Fathers’ Noble Vision. For readers unfamiliar with the elusive musk deer Dr. Shah tells explains later in many other words that man is the master of his own destiny whether he knows it or not.

Shah opens this book with his philosophy and his vision of reconstructing the four pillars of society (family life education government and religion media) that preserve individual freedom and liberty by creating a new generation of “Mono-Leaders” who will lead the way to a mature responsible society.

According to Shah all human beings belong to one of three groups. The first includes people who have used their “so-called intelligence.” These are the politicians philosophers thinkers businessmen educators or the “Mono-Leaders” who control man’s destiny through various means. The second group—the largest one—is what Shah labels as the “Common Man” who “is lowly placed in life and is seriously struggling to rise up.” The third sorry category is composed of those “who merely pass a miserable existence and are to a great extent oblivious of what is passing around them.” Shah appears to be exhorting the members of groups two and three to strive for membership in the first.

What emerges vaguely from Dr. Shah’s impenetrable prose is advice that may be good but is certainly nothing new. He builds on a foundation of old-fashioned ideals like self-reliance and the power of positive thinking and throws in an occasional musk deer in an attempt to make them appear if not new then at least mystically Eastern.

Most readers will have a difficult time understanding how to become a Mono-Leader thanks to the author’s stream-of-consciousness style of writing which in many sections eschews the basics of good grammar spelling or punctuation. Those who have the perseverance to slog through Dr. Shah’s discourse on the Founding Father’s philosophy and the tenets of many self-help gurus will be able to distill much of this information to the following: It is in within man’s reach to become a perfect autonomous being.

The final part of the book is a film treatment titled “Realization Village” the love story of two people who despite their numerous successes are still unhappy. To acquire a new set of values they make the to move to the Realization Village where Shah’s vision of the four pillars of society help them reach a level of self-awareness and enlightenment to eventually become an integral part of a mature and responsible society.

There is little doubt that we all want to improve and take charge of our lives in a responsible fashion and Dr. Shah does make some valid points which might come through more clearly with some editing help and revisions of the text. As it stands The 2nd Revolution of our Founding Father’s Noble Vision is an incoherent mish-mash of ideas and psycho-babble that make the going as difficult as tracking a musk deer through dense underbrush.