ForeWord Reviews

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Three-Shot Golf for Women

A revolutionary approach to lower scores in less time

Foreword Review — May / June 1999

Golf is a tough game and there have been countless books written on how to improve scores and lower blood pressure after a miserable day on the greens. In this new book, Coles writes: “The heart of this book and of my three-shot golf system is learning to get your thirty-yard pitch shot onto the green every time.” Coles—a former LPGA touring pro who now teaches golf —guarantees lower scores as readers improve this one particular shot.

Three-Shot Golf’s tips and photos are geared toward women, including beginners, returnees and seasoned players. Coles connects with her readers when she mentions how women do not have time to take on long hours of practicing. She also mentions that women are too preoccupied with hitting for distance. She prefers that women work toward shooting bogey golf, that is, card ninety on a par seventy-two course. “Most players—men and women—almost never shoot this well,” she says.

The book is written in an easy-going, conversational manner with a decent mix of photos to illustrate grips and stances. She mixes stories into the how-to’s to break up the monotony. She has taught golf long enough to be able to see what does and does not work with beginners.

It helps knowing the fundamentals of the game because this book does not address every aspect of golf. Coles does, however, get some of the basics in: buying the right equipment, working on the right grip, developing the correct posture and practicing an effortless swing.

The three main points Coles stresses are mastering thirty-yard pitch shots, handling fairway woods and developing the tee shot. She also covers putting, chipping and sand play. One fascinating chapter covers mental strategies. One heading is “Developing optimism as a golfer (a pretty good idea for other areas of life, too).” The chapter is written by a performance-enhancement psychologist and includes such topics as dealing with self-blame and remembering that golf is a game, not a life-or-death situation.

Carol Hopkins