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The Vatican Third Secret Hoax - Exposed! and the Truth Revealed

Clarion Review (3 Stars)

Strong and precise writing brings effective assertiveness to this exposé on a mystery of the Virgin Mary.

While Iain Colquhoun claims amateur status as an interpreter of church prophecy, his effort at interpreting the “Third Secret of Fatima” (the name of a supposed revelation of the Virgin Mary in 1917 Portugal) through the lens of scripture and history is thorough and exacting.

Colquhoun sets out to show readers not only how to solve the mystery of the Third Secret, but how he believes the Vatican has been less than forthcoming about the mystery it has stewarded. The “hoax” claim is a Vatican interpretation that is inconsistent with scripture and history, as well as discontinuous from one church leader to another, the book asserts.

Despite the title, Colquhoun’s aim goes further than simple exposé. He takes readers step by step through events of world history since 1917 and outlines his theory that Russia is the instrument designed to indirectly corrupt the practices of the Catholic Church, namely the validity of Mass, by introducing “false ecumenism.” Colquhoun says this process, beginning with Stalin’s regime, is still in play. The author warns readers to make “necessary preparation” for the impending crisis of the Catholic Church, as prophesied in the Third Secret.

The writing is solid, precise, and footnoted appropriately. Indeed, a heavy degree of historical research is evidenced in the footnotes, a deterrent to any skeptic questioning the author’s claims. Organization of the material results in a somewhat circular pattern, cycling back over the initial claims with more detail in later chapters. At times, this further analysis lends a repetitive air when, in fact, Colquhoun is delving deeper into his argument.

Some of the author’s interpretations are subjective, but this is the liability of interpreting prophecy. It’s likely that not all readers will take every interpretive leap with him, such as when he says because the Third Secret reveals that because the Roman Catholic Church was the “target” of an attack, it necessarily “incurred such a punishment” and, therefore, “its ministers must have been failing in their essential mission so gravely that they have started to promote sin.”

Non-Catholic readers (and maybe some nominal or lapsed Catholics) may not know what to make of the title. There is little in the description on the back of the book to offer context for those with no reference point for the Third Secret or the Vatican’s response to it. The front cover is also jarring, with multiple font styles and sizes emphasizing different phrases within the title.

That said, The Vatican Third Secret Hoax will likely attract readers who are deeply vested in understanding extrabiblical prophecy recognized by the Roman Catholic Church, as well as those who have a desire to further their understanding of the end-time. Colquhoun succeeds in providing a thorough interpretive lens for the reader.

Heather Weber