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The 13th Chapter

Clarion Review (1 Stars)

For most of his life, Graeme Boshoff experienced the same series of dreams five or six times a week. He details these in The 13th Chapter.

In the first dream, and the most frequent of the series, Boshoff is told that he needs to save approximately twenty fish trapped behind a huge earthen dam and stop a war. As he wanders through his dream world, a group of mysterious people attempt to guide him: “There is a tall blonde girl, another girl with lightly ginger/blonde hair (Kooler) and 2 Indian boys (who are quite consistent throughout the dream). There is also a Rastafarian man, 2 white teenagers, 2 more girls and about 8-10 other guides that would sporadically appear and disappear over the years.[sic]” Mysteriously, the guides never tell Boshoff why he needs to free the fish or stop the war. They all assume he knows.

The dreams become more and more bizarre until he finds himself standing in a land of ruins left over from a war between giants and dragons. Like most dreams, which seem logical as they’re happening, the cycle becomes more disjointed the further along one reads.

Boshoff abruptly changes course after this cycle to detail an out-of-body experience he had while in a coma. According to the author, the visions and the dreams were all some kind of message confirmed by The Truth About the Bible Code Part II, a collection of supposed biblical prophecies, most of which have failed to happen, published in 2002: “Every single page kept on ‘confirmation,’ turn, confirmation, yes Graeme, turn, yes, confirmation, yes, yes, yes, correct, absolutely yes, yes, confirmation, etc.”

But the message is only hinted at until the final chapter of The 13th Chapter, “Letter of Warning,” where he explains that humanity has been reverse engineering alien technology from crashed UFOs. While the aliens plan to share this technology with earthlings, humanity’s curiosity threatens global extinction. But, Boshoff writes, “I have been told that I can stop this; I know where the fish are; and that they will eat whatever it is that will cause this. However that is entirely dependent on whatever mankind’s response to this letter is?”

It’s difficult to review this as a memoir, a prophecy, or any other kind of book. The writing is bewildering and confused to the point of being unintelligible. With the exception of the fish reference, the dreams have no explained connection to the author’s coma vision or his letter of warning. And what The Truth About the Bible Code Part II confirms is never made clear. To point out myriad minor flaws, like opening with an epilogue, or to criticize the book’s lack of coherency would fail to get at its fundamental flaws. Without serious editing, Boshoff’s warnings will remain incoherent and unreadable.

Joseph Thompson