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Teen Goddess

How to Look Love & Live Like a Goddess

Foreword Review — Sept / Oct 2003

Every girl is a goddess. All a girl needs to realize this is to discover the “goddess within,” and tap the power resident in her. The author developed her system of combining spiritual practice and self-improvement using goddess power when life handed her difficult situations, such as overcoming an eating disorder or a getting through a rough time in her marriage.

Wishart presents the ways that girls can find and use their own goddess power through guided meditations and “goddess workouts.” One such workout asks the reader to construct and decorate a box where wishes will be kept, to be opened and updated as wishes do or do not come true. Another has the reader invoke “divine dieting” by creating a spiritual blueprint for a realistic ideal body, choosing actions and words that support that image, and calling on the goddess for help to sustain that blueprint every day.

Not all of these workouts are peaceful, however. Part of awakening the goddess within is taking a good, clear look at things most people don’t want to see about themselves. To do this, the reader is asked to make a map of her own personal wasteland, “the Celtic land where everything stagnates and rots,” drawing pictures depicting all the activities and habits that harm her, habits such as smoking, drinking, or procrastinating. The reader is instructed to keep the map of her wasteland where she can see it every day, as a reminder of the things that can make her life a wasteland.

The author is an award-winning make-up artist who grew up in New Zealand, where she studied journalism and then graduated with honors as an esthetician from the prestigious Aveda Horst Education Center. Her articles have appeared in many publications including The New Zealand Herald and The Albuquerque Journal. She has been teaching classes for over a decade, helping women all over the world to discover their own inner goddess.

Along with the goddess workouts, the author provides chapters on individual goddesses, from Bridget of Ireland to Kuan Yin of China, showing the challenges each goddess faced and how she overcame them. The reader can bring the qualities of these goddesses into her life by using “Goddess Glamours” (enchantments the author provides), as well as more goddess exercises, to manifest the goddesses in the physical realm.

For example, a girl can adopt the qualities of Scathach, the original “punk rock warrior goddess” when she feels she needs to complete a difficult task or combat bullies. Scathach trained warriors, so any girl who wants to adopt this goddess’s qualities needs to be willing to get into really good shape. The author recommends that the reader take up power walking or dancing at least twenty minutes a day in order to manifest the qualities of Scathach. The reader must also choose one task she has been putting off because she is too scared to do it-something hard, like taking a math test or confronting someone who hurt her. She should select a target date that the task will be completed, and visualize the task as successfully completed for ten minutes each day until it is truly done.

To embody the appearance of the goddess Scathach, the reader is instructed to apply fake tattoos and to spike her hair with maximum-hold gel. The author allows that the Celts used lime paste, but that a good hair gel will suffice. Even if the reader simply strides around her house in her newly toned body wearing the Celtic jewelry, tattoos, and spiked hair of the warrior goddess, the qualities of Scathach can manifest and aid her in her ultimate tasks.

The use of goddess power can enrich a girl’s life with real magic, the kind that often requires work and patience, but is always rewarding. As the author says, a girl can truly “conjure her destiny” by invoking the qualities of the ancient goddesses. (September

Carol Lynn Stewart