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Multi-Trillion Dollar U.S. Healthcare to 2020 Gold Rush

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

For decades, the issue of health care has been among the most controversial topics in American politics. Edmund L. Valentine, a seasoned health care industry professional, presents his own perspective on this topic in his new book, Multi-Trillion Dollar U.S. Healthcare to 2020 Gold Rush. Purporting to follow neither a Republican nor a Democratic agenda, Valentine offers his insight into the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and possible future regulations related to this legislation.

The author’s style is straightforward. His book is geared to the people of this country who want to know more but who may not be particularly well-informed about the major trends and many innovations in the health care industry. Valentine covers numerous topics over the course of twenty very specific chapters. Each issue is introduced with a simple declarative sentence that is followed by an equally simple, carefully worded explanation. These explanations are basic, and they focus on the topic at hand.

Valentine backs up his assertions with easy-to-understand charts and graphs that support the information he has provided. Granted, many of these supporting examples come from the author’s own company, MMC International, but data and charted analyses from a number of other health care industry sources are also provided.

Some of the topics addressed in this book may be beyond the personal interest level of some people. For instance, they may not wish to delve into material about multi-trillion dollar “healthcare inefficiencies.” They also may not be in a position to take advantage of the proposed opportunities—market-share competition and potential investment returns—that Valentine says might be available as a result of eliminating those inefficiencies. Nonetheless, a large audience will probably be very interested in reading about impending changes to the compensation of health care providers “based on the quality of their care, instead of the volume of tests and treatments they perform,” or about the expiration of drug patents, which will promote lower-cost generic drugs over brand-name pharmaceuticals.

Fortunately, Valentine presents his material in a well-formatted manner that makes it easy for readers to choose among the topics. His clear writing can provide new insights to an audience that has a varying degree of interest in the health care industry. In all, Multi-Trillion Dollar U.S. Healthcare to 2020 Gold Rush provides a thought-provoking introduction to the numerous changes—along with the challenges and opportunities—that the implementation of PPACA and other health care legislation has precipitated.

Cheryl M. Hibbard