ForeWord Reviews

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Compound Yield

The Investors Edge in a Traders World

Clarion Review (2 Stars)

Investing for the rest of us: how to make money even if you’re not a professional trader.

Compound Yield is the new book by Robert K. Naguszewski and the name given to an investment strategy that promises to help private investors not only survive but prosper in an environment where most of the money tends to end up in the hands of professional traders.

Devised by Naguszewski, a medical doctor by trade, after a decade of traditional trading left his retirement fund wanting, Compound Yield promises an investment strategy free from the fear and greed that professional traders feed on. As Naguszewski writes, “The book is for those who have always charted their own course, have gotten kicked in the gut, and have gotten back up again.”

According to the author, “Compound Yield, operationally, is a strategy that combines high-yield investing with safe-trading to progressively produce increasing income.” This is the fundamental principle of Naguszewski’s strategy. He walks the reader through the details of the plan step-by-step—indeed stock-by-stock—in a logical way, often referring to emails he has written to friends asking for advice.

Naguszewski starts with a basic list of truths one must be willing to accept about trading, and life in general, to continue further. The plan appears to have been researched but is also experientially based; the text is presented in a conversational manner that an attentive reader uneducated on the subject can readily grasp.

Though there appears to be a real strategy here, delineated in a manner that can be understood by people who don’t have strong prior knowledge of the way the stock market works, the book lacks footnotes or an index to help find the information one would need to put the author’s ideas into play. Naguszewski does seem to have a bevy of information to impart, but much of it is unformatted and a strain to read. The hard data should have been presented in a more professional manner through the use of tables, graphs, or bulleted lists. The front cover is generic but inoffensive; the back cover is a glut of text with no author bio or other standard inclusions.

Wall Street speculation is certainly a hot topic. With Compound Yield, Naguszewski promises a plan to help normal people navigate the shark-infested waters of high finance. While the information included may be sound and insightful, much of the book is difficult to read and absorb.

Barbara Bamberger Scott