ForeWord Reviews

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The New England Cookbook

350 Recipes from Town and Country Land and Sea, Hearth and Home

Foreword Review — Sept / Oct 1999

What at first glance seems to be suspiciously like a Junior League cookbook turns out to be a surprise. The New England Cookbook is packed full of delightful, polished recipes that will bring to life even long jaded tastebuds. If Dojny’s new cookbook metamorphosed into a person, it would probably be a comforting, competent and wonderfully generous grandmother. This lady might seem a little old-fashioned but inside she’s savvy and sophisticated.

Dojny demonstrates her enthusiasm for her subject in seventeen sections. She begins with The Chowder, Soup and Stew Pot and goes on to Chicken and Other Birds; Baked Beans and Other “Made” Dishes; Fin Fish; and A Harvest of Vegetables to end with Cobblers, Shortcakes, Puddings plus two more dessert sections.

The New England Cookbook draws on an American bounty of corn, beans, cranberries, blueberries, plums, squash, maple syrup, turkey, venison, oysters, clams and lobster. Dojny has collected recipes woven with the skills and sensibilities of the many ethnic cultures that have infiltrated New England. This book not only brings us up to date on America’s changing culinary landscape, it is full of colorful and hearty food from the American Northeast.

Dojny’s new cookbook is first a New England cookbook chock full of recipes like Public Supper Banana Cream Pie and Shaker Grilled Pork Tenderloin Sandwich. It is second a chronicle of New England’s ethnic heritage with recipes like Mrs. Rosinzski’s Stuffed Cabbage, Lip-Searing Little Kitchen Jerk Chicken, Pierogi with Several Fillings and Portuguese Style Caramel Flan. Third, this cookbook is a wealth of anecdote interwoven with informational tidbits on New England and its food.

This luxurious mountain of recipes and stories will make cooks itch to set aside a weekend for cooking. They will find themselves pushing the family out to play and taking the phone off the hook to immerse themselves in the warmth and friendliness of The New England Cookbook.

Nancy K. Allen