ForeWord Reviews

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The Little Book of Letting Go

A Revolutionary 30 Day Program to Cleanse Your Mind Lift Your Spirit and Replenish Your Soul

Foreword Review — July / Aug 2000

“A mind that learns to let go gradually returns to its inherent wholeness, happiness, and simplicity.” In modern society, concern with external appearances dominates the lives of many people, leaving them with the sense that they are missing something or that their lives lack meaning. Hugh Prather, a Methodist minister, host of Wisdom Radio’s “Living in the Light,” and author of more than fourteen books, presents a method of working with one’s mind and life that has been shown to lead to the ability to live with grace, peace, and the mental flexibility needed to function well no matter what the day may bring.

This goal may seem an impossibility for all but a saint, but Prather ably demonstrates that such a life is possible for all who are willing to learn to “let go” of the attitudes and thought patterns that hinder peace. He states: “We are free to change our line of thought—our mental orientation, our reality preference—anytime we choose. It’s as simple as gripping the wheel tightly and looking down at the road, or gripping it easily and looking out at the road. The road remains the same, but we can drive it hard or light.”

Along with the explanatory text, Prather includes stories of people dealing with challenges and gives release exercises for letting go of attitudes and habits like worry, the use of crisis as motivation, past stories, misery, neglect, fear of happiness, and the need to predict and control outcomes. There are release exercises to help heal both inner and relational conflict and change rigid response patterns, perfectionism, and, perhaps the most damaging of all beliefs, that of “spiritual specialness,”—a belief which thrives on judgment and creates emotional separation between those for whom unity could be one of life’s greatest joys.

The difference between what Prather offers in this work and the message of so many of today’s speakers and teachers is one of depth. In order to grow into wholeness, real work must be done. Lasting change is accomplished by understanding and dealing with what hinders that change. Readers of this book will be led on an experiential journey characterized by honesty, gentleness, humor, and much practical and spiritual wisdom.

Kristine Morris