ForeWord Reviews

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The Inner Art of Vegetarianism

Spiritual Practices for Body and Soul

Foreword Review — July / Aug 2000

Vegetarianism has found its home nestled in the creative and active practice of spiritual wholeness. By focusing on the universal desire for unity between body and soul, the author reveals the relationship and benefits of eating meatless meals. Adams states: “The main concern [of this book] is the nature of spiritual practice.” Some of the more familiar spiritual practices of keeping a journal, meditation, yoga, dream work, breathe work, and vegetarianism all come together here for “the purpose, action, belief and actualization” of wholeness.

Adams comes from a background of writing, yoga, advocacy, and cooking. She has combined her talents to help others who struggle with unifying their belief system and eating habits. The book includes twenty-one exercises and/or poses that are interspersed throughout the chapters. They are practical, action-oriented meditations that exemplify the author’s philosophies.

Since spiritual practices are so common today, this book is written in a relaxed, nondogmatic style. The author speaks from her personal experience and inspires the reader not necessarily to be the perfect vegetarian, but more so to embrace a lifestyle that is spiritually focused and balanced. Her wisdom regarding eating “nonviolently” is easily understood within the process of achieving wholeness. If a spiritual practitioner is seeking personal unity and integration with all sentient beings, then respect for animals is a given. Why take their lives to get the nutrition from grains and greens? A more immediate relationship to the sustenance of life is less demanding on the world, more practical economically, and simply more enlightened.

Adams says: “As we commit ourselves to a practice of vegetarianism we discover that peace is a feeling that goes much deeper than we had realized. The doing of the work itself, the learning of the techniques of food preparation, the experience of creating vegetarian dishes offers us an opportunity to feel a sense of pleasure, peace, and harmony. Creating vegetarian food is the still point of the day.” The author suggests that by focusing on and cultivating a strong spiritual routine, the way of vegetarianism will spontaneously follow. She encourages vegetarians and nonvegetarians sharing her knowledge and perspective of an integrated and active spiritual life.

Aimé Merizon