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Teresa Scollon, Book Reviewer

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Book Review

Midnight Lantern

by Teresa Scollon

“You write in your time. You are of that time,” said Tess Gallagher in a 1999 interview. She was speaking of her 1976 award-winning Instructions to the Double, often lauded as showcasing a woman’s voice published when women were... Read More

Book Review

Uncanny Valley

by Teresa Scollon

Imagine the journalist’s life: immersed in experience, on intimate terms with one’s subject, embarked on multiple and continuous journeys of discovery, and then asked to explain it all to a distractible audience. This is Lawrence... Read More

Book Review

Surpassing Pleasure

by Teresa Scollon

In the general silence of a Cistercian abbey, one might hope for the numinous to reveal itself—and so it does in John Slater’s poems. From the very first poem in this first collection, Slater, a Cistercian monk, promises that “here... Read More

Book Review

Fine Incisions

by Teresa Scollon

“The critic,” writes Eric Ormsby, “must stimulate curiosity but he or she must also appeal to our innate sense of justice. Like it or not, the critic is a judge…We may flinch from the ‘judgmental’ but at the same time, I... Read More

Book Review

The South Wind

by Teresa Scollon

Distilling the bittersweet, capturing what it means to be creatures in love with a fleeting world of wonders—this is the specialty of poets. Adele Ne Jame’s poems are lovely examples of the art. In this beautiful collection, Ne Jame... Read More

Book Review

The Book of What Stays

by Teresa Scollon

This is a marvelous book: a debut collection filled with the voice of an old soul, someone who has battled to claim what he knows. James Crews’ compassionate intelligence ranges wide, looking for stories within the stories of news... Read More

Book Review

Last Seen

by Teresa Scollon

Daily life, Jacqueline Jones LaMon believes, is filled with the absences of people and stories. “This silence is the source of these poems,” she writes. Inspired by photos of missing people, this collection responds by imagining the... Read More

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