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Stephanie Bucklin, Book Reviewer

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Book Review

Chemistry

by Stephanie Bucklin

When Stella Blunt arrives at a new school, her abrasive and straight-shooting personality doesn’t make her many new friends—with the exception of Howard “Howie” Mullins, a sweet, shy boy in her Chemistry class who also happens to... Read More

Book Review

Recruits

by Stephanie Bucklin

Twins Sean and Dillon Kirrell, age seventeen, have an unusual hobby: drawing a strange, otherworldly train station that came to them in a vision ten years ago. Soon a mysterious man named Carver appears, telling the Kirrell brothers that... Read More

Book Review

Sexual Assault

by Stephanie Bucklin

This important teen guide performs two crucial functions: educating teens on numerous myths associated with sexual assault, and showing teens how to help both themselves and their friends. Given that teens are, according to the author,... Read More

Book Review

Here We Are

by Stephanie Bucklin

In a book that includes contributors such as Mindy Kaling and Roxane Gay, "Here We Are" is a compilation of pieces that analyze what it means to be a modern feminist. Part essay collection, part social commentary, and part educational... Read More

Book Review

That Burning Summer

by Stephanie Bucklin

In July 1940, sixteen-year-old Peggy finds a crashed plane and its injured pilot, Henryk, in the marsh off the south coast of England. The Polish airman expresses fear of the war, telling Peggy he cannot go back to the Royal Air Force.... Read More

Book Review

Loving vs. Virginia

by Stephanie Bucklin

Can love conquer all? That is the question addressed in "Loving vs. Virginia", a novel told in alternating perspectives. Two lovers of different races struggle to achieve the right to wed in a society that may not be ready to accept... Read More

Book Review

Painless

by Stephanie Bucklin

On the day that seventeen-year old Quinn’s father dies, Quinn is hit by a car. The accident is minor, but Quinn feels no pain—he never does. Quinn feels no physical pain because he was born with a neurological condition. Because of... Read More

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