Foreword Reviews

John Flesher, Book Reviewer

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Book Review

New Stories from the South

by John Flesher

In the preface to this pleasing collection of short stories, culled from magazines printed in 1998, Tony Early fires a shot across the bow. The target: anyone who presumes from the title that what follows is a batch of condescending,... Read More

Book Review

The Circus at the Edge of the Earth

by John Flesher

Mired in a creative rut in the spring of 1997, Wilkins—whose previous works include After the Applause with hockey icon Gordie Howe—indulged a childhood fantasy and ran off with the circus. “I craved a little risk and excitement,... Read More

Book Review

The Haunted Major

by John Flesher

“I am a popular man,” Jacky Gore greets one in this deliciously humorous short novel, published in Britain in 1902 but only now in the United States, “and withal I am not vain.” Why, certainly not. It is hardly the fault of... Read More

Book Review

A Few Small Candles

by John Flesher

Larry Gara was a war resister when it wasn’t fashionable. World War II is widely seen as “the good war,” a triumph of righteousness over evil with little of the moral ambiguity that clouded subsequent conflicts. In this collection... Read More

Book Review

Readings

by John Flesher

Birkerts is a secular prophet, a voice in the wilderness preaching the virtues of the printed word to a society mesmerized by electronic glitz. This volume is fittingly titled—a collection of essays whose common theme is that serious... Read More

Book Review

George Washington's Mount Vernon

by John Flesher

Schoolchildren know Mount Vernon as Washington’s estate near the city that bears his name. Serious history students are aware of the passion our first president felt for his country home, his beloved refuge from the frustrations of... Read More

Book Review

My Father, My Self

by John Flesher

My Father, My Self is a seeming no-brainer: Children need good fathers. Yet, as author Masa Aiba Goetz notes, it wasn’t long ago that society regarded fathers as peripheral to the intellectual, emotional and spiritual development of... Read More

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