ForeWord Reviews

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Recordando a Abuela (Remembering Grandma)

Foreword Review — Jan / Feb 2004

“For a moment Lorena could almost see Grandma running to greet them, her silver hair flying, and Grandpa greeting them in his full, almost shouting voice.” Memories can be confusing, even when they feel good: Grandma has passed away, causing the young Lorena to wonder about heaven.

One afternoon, as she and her grieving grandfather are poking through Grandma’s old trunk of personals, Grandpa says, “Come on m’ijita. I think it’s time this hat of Grandma’s saw the light of day.” Hand in hand, Lorena and Grandpa walk through Grandma’s garden: “His eyes were sparkling and a peaceful smile was back on his face.” They bring each other to a common ground, both beginning in their own ways to accept Grandma’s passing.

The author works in the field of education in California and develops her own inquisitive nature by working with children. She finds writing stories and poetry relaxing. This is her first published children’s book.

The illustrator, a member of the Central Texas Pastel Society, has attended many different schools of art and shown her work in several art galleries and collections. Her skills are evident in the illustrations that show the laugh lines on Grandpa’s face. No detail goes unnoticed. From the curly hair of the light gray poodle to the wrinkles in Lorena’s pink T-shirt, the illustrations pop, right down to the flowers in the garden. There is a lot for readers to look at, and it is all very pleasantly done.

This story, appropriate for children ages four to eight, could be a helpful tool for dealing with the passing of loved ones. The pain of loss, the confusion, the loving memories, and the acceptance of change are present in this story of memories and love. It taps the human emotions and can help young children to experience a healthy method of coping with death.