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Manifest Destiny

Clarion Review (2 Stars)

Gerardus Ramc, author of eight books, is a passionate secular humanist with an exceptional grasp of how religion has detrimentally influenced human behavior. Manifest Destiny, as the title portends, is his extrapolation on the nineteenth-century use of the term “Manifest Destiny” to justify American land expansion as a God ordained right. Taking ownership of a supreme being, whether Christian, Muslim, Hindu, or other, as an infallible and absolute justification for everything from land grabbing to war to suicide bombings, has been the rule throughout history, the author contends.

Ramc lists, in adjective-laden, scholarly detail, a litany of what he sees as irrefutable examples of the destructive insanity of all religions. From the birth of Christianity through the Inquisition to contemporary fanaticism, Ramc convincingly lays out an impressive argument for his assertion that religion has done much harm and little good to humanity. He excessively dissects the ubiquitous problems with religion and then, paradoxically, shudders at what the world would be like without them. He writes, “Can humanity live without religion? And the answer, it seems to me, is a resounding NO! Close all the churches, synagogues, mosques, and temples. Kill and exile all the clowns i.e. the preachers and prophets…and humanity would come to a complete standstill first, a stunned paralysis, to quickly succumb to a frightened boredom with chaotic rioting thereafter…” Ramc goes on to state that even the atheists and agnostics don’t have the answers and that both sides may be equally addicted to a belief system.

Ramc relentlessly condemns all religions with an unbiased aversion. His occasional introspection and token use of the dialectic method serve as a refreshing contrast to the almost constant barrage of religion bashing. Some readers will find his nihilistic views of human history difficult to read. For example, in reference to reincarnation, his prose leans toward hyperbole, “Those that deserve punishment after death will come back as despicable ferocious creatures, worms, vermin, poisonous frogs, killer bees, acid spitting piranhas, Aids carrying combat bats, werewolves and sadistic pedophile priests!”

Typographical errors, run-on sentences, repetition, and redundancies diminish the readability of Manifest Destiny. This book will appeal mostly to the hardcore secular humanists, atheists, and agnostics.

Patty Sutherland