ForeWord Reviews

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From This Day Forward

Foreword Review — May / June 2000

Marriage, according to Webster, is “a close union” or “the mutual relation of husband and wife.” During the past thirty years, the divorce rate has skyrocketed, along with a multitude of self-help and how-to keep your marriage strong books. The Roberts have beaten the odds, working together in “close union” and displaying their “mutual relationship” in myriad ways. They were married in the late 1960s, a Catholic girl and a Jewish boy, at a time when interfaith marriages were still frowned upon. They worked in new media, a high-stress and high profile business. They live and work in Washington, D.C., and have celebrated thirty years of marriage.

Cokie and Steve share the narration of their collaboration, a highly effective style that allows the listener to eavesdrop on personal reminiscence. One is privy to Cokie’s frustration at Steve when their children were small, and he was too involved in his work to appreciate all she did. He will agree and add comments of his own that do not reflect well on himself as a young man. They continue, back and forth, remarking that many of the things they went through were reflective of their peers and society at the time.

Looking back, they share the feelings they had when they moved so far from their families. The positive on their marriage as they become a family unit with their new children, the negative of not having the support system right there. They generally observe that families in our very mobile society often face this same occurrence. Situations like this lead to either stronger marriages or breakups.

The Roberts’ adventures continue on to their time in Greece, back to the United States and through the ups and downs of their marriage. Through it all they have faced problems and burdens with grace and humor.

Another self-help marriage/prevent divorce book this is not. A shining example of how to stay together, what can be right in marriage and marital longevity it is.

Deborah Jesseman