ForeWord Reviews

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Cooking With Dogs

Foreword Review — Sept / Oct 1998

When you hear a dog barking in your neighborhood, think about this-there are another 52.9 million dogs being loved and taken care of by 31 percent of the population. We are dog parents who treat our pets like children.

Most of the stories in Cooking With Dogs are true to life, right down to the big black nose on the counter and the puddle of drool.

“Dog Poets” gives new meaning to the saying “don’t eat yellow snow.” As author Dowell says, “they breathe their best work” after leaving their signature in the snow, and then move on to more important things. “Rawhide” might reveal more about the writer than the dog-chewing on a rawhide bone being equated with canine oral sex is a stretch. Dogs live to eat and a rawhide bone offers them the chewing needed for healthy teeth and gums. “Dog Phone” is funny and maybe a little far fetched, but when we dream of a dog in charge, anything can happen. Maybe the next time he’ll order pizza for you before kissing you awake. “Love Story” is touching. Dogs do love, not only people but also other dogs. When they are parted from their love, they grieve, sometimes for years. Dogs smile and dogs cry.

This book tells of joys and frustrations of raising dogs, which sometimes isn’t too different form raising kids. Then there are working dogs with a day job just like you and more loyal than anyone you’ll ever know.

Of all the wonderful illustrations in this book, Dearth’s “On Hold” says it all. Whether it’s been a hard day working or just waiting for attention, that big black nose has eased it’s way under your newspaper and the dog is heaving huge sighs, with each one making his head a little heavier on your leg until you finally notice him. Dog lovers will definitely relate to Cooking with Dogs.

Pat Wolff