ForeWord Reviews

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There's an Angel in my Computer

A Journey of Spiritual Emergence

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

In There’s an Angel in my Computer, author Carol Gino employs a clever and entertaining communication device: a running dialogue between herself and an angel. In doing so, she develops a powerful relationship that helps her complete a spiritual journey toward writing and healing. The witty and humorous exchange between author and angel makes for a warm and touching reading experience.

A childhood quest for a spiritual vision is fulfilled when the author meets Rashana, an angel who communicates with her through Instant Messaging on the Internet, the only means, Rashana tells her, to “create a bridge between my realm and yours.” For years Rashana had tried in vain to encourage Gino to look inside herself through prayer and meditation. Gino learns that Rashana is not only an angelic guide who has been at her side all along, but also a spirit that is, in fact, Gino’s higher self. It is a discovery that allows Gino to grow during her spiritual journey. “Too many souls are unaware of their higher connections,” she writes.

As a self-help book, There’s an Angel in my Computer offers readers much in the way of inspirational guidance: Follow one’s heart; stop the chattering of the mind; meditate, and center one’s self to awaken the creative soul and spirit within. Though brought up as a Christian, the author draws heavily on Buddhist philosophy, embracing surrendering and letting go, living in the present, and grounding and centering the mind to better grow and get in touch with the spiritual realm.

Unlike more generic spirituality self-help books, There’s an Angel in my Computer does not include lessons or end-of-chapter exercises, nor does it provide practical spiritual techniques and applications to overcome challenges in life. However, Gino’s personal journey, expressed through her journal format, provides readers with an intimate look at building a relationship with one’s higher self, and serves as an inspirational tool and guide. Gino suggests that anyone can benefit from contact with the spiritual realm; she believes that a communication to an angelic realm can often occur without one realizing it. Spirit guides serve many roles and take many forms of expression within our lives, inspiring creativity and insight, helping open the heart to discover one’s soul purpose, and protecting and comforting the body and mind.

Because Gino does not associate her vision quest with a religiously motivated divine-calling with God, her book should appeal to a wider mainstream audience and benefit those readers searching for a way to get in touch with their soul purpose. Whether one is seeking to reunite with the goodness of the child or the goddess/god spirit within, the author’s intimate exploration of finding her own guide to a higher self, and joy in life’s journey, is bound to touch the hearts and minds of seekers.

Gary Klinga