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Matter to Mind to Consciousness

Anatomy of the E.L.F.

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

In a previous work, God at the Speed of Light, T. Lee Baumann explored the mystical realm of electromagnetic radiation—a network of cosmic consciousness stretching across the universe. This network connects all matter and beings with God, light, and spirit. In his most recent book, Matter to Mind to Consciousness, Baumann takes the reader on a journey throughout the labyrinths of the brain, foremost examining neuron activity and the central nervous system (CNS).

The brain is an extraordinary organ, comprised of 100 billion cells. The CNS acts like a parallel processor, multi-tasking better than the most sophisticated computer. It also produces electromagnetic radiation, or E.L.F. (Extremely Low Frequency), which transmits signals through space as light. Though it was once believed that every neuron communicated with at least one other neuron, recent studies have proven otherwise. But then how can these neurons function in the absence of a completed circuit? Baumann argues that these cells work collaboratively with the cosmic consciousness through the milieu of electromagnetism that permeates the universe. Neurons communicate telepathically beyond the body. The CNS acts like a complex antenna for a vast electromagnetic network. Baumann believes this network represents the consciousness (awareness) of the entire cosmos: “a storehouse of information—past, present, and future.”

This short work is a primer on electromagnetism and its bearing on human awareness and consciousness. Science and spirituality are merging. The book is intended for those interested in finding a scientific explanation to paranormal phenomena, including mystical revelations in prayer, near death experiences, déjà vu, dreams, clairvoyance, and visions of light and God. Once a skeptic about God’s existence, Baumann now believes it is impossible to deny. Ironically, his spirituality rests on principles of quantum physics.

The author apologizes for some of the “intimidating” scientific terminology he presents; most readers will find it challenging to assimilate some of the medical and scientific material. But the read is well worth the effort because it is not essential to comprehend the system of electromagnetic wavelengths or Einstein’s theory of relativity or non-locality, or Jung’s related notion of the collective unconscious, in order to understand Baumann’s assertion that there is an anatomical relationship between human consciousness and universal awareness.

Perhaps younger readers might better grasp the concept of a cosmic consciousness if Baumann had expressed his notion as a global consciousness or universal database. In fact, the author does briefly compare the brain to a computer, using the analogy of the Internet with the existence of cosmic consciousness. Just as the Internet connects computers across the globe, the cosmic consciousness connects human minds. Baumann readily admits that science is still limited in its technology and is unable to explain empirically the matter to mind to consciousness theory. Yet, Matter to Mind to Consciousness does offer a plausible and fascinating explanation for the phenomenon. Baumann is a physician and “quantum spirituality” consultant living in Birmingham, Alabama.

Gary Klinga