ForeWord Reviews

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Leadership for Success

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

Modern life owes a lot to Proverbs 23, “As a man thinketh, so shall he be.” Not only has this line from the Bible become the cornerstone of the teachings of Tony Robbins, Zig Ziglar, and others in the self-improvement and self-actualization movement, it’s also inspired millions of people to achieve their goals in life.

For all the people it’s inspired, however, there are billions of others who have overlooked or missed this statement—people like Nimble Jack, a business owner who was drifting through life, unable to thrive despite the resources he had. That was, until he met Dr. Alfred Nkut, an entrepreneur, philanthropist, and physician who showed Nimble Jack how to stop focusing on the negative and become the person he wanted to be. These sessions inspired and provided the bedrock for Nkut’s Leadership for Success, a book designed to help people lead themselves and others to a better life.

Nkut’s philosophy of leadership is simple: “Leadership is not one big thing you do,” he writes. “It’s a deliberate art. Lots of little things you do have a cumulative long-term effect on your life.” In the book’s ten chapters, Nkut shows readers how to change their leadership style by looking at the little things. He explains how to move from serving the self to serving a higher cause, how one’s focus determines one’s present, and how to combat negative behavior and think like a winner. From there, Nkut advises readers to pick a leadership style that fits their needs and describes how they can win the confidence of those they lead.

Readers familiar with the works of Claude Bristol, Norman Vincent Peale, Dale Carnegie, or some of the other classic self-improvement gurus are likely to find many of the same ideas outlined in Nkut’s work. But the book is hardly derivative. Nkut is an inspiring teacher, and his ideas are laid out so simply that it will seem natural to implement them in day-to-day life.

While Nkut covers his concepts more quickly than Bristol, Peale, Carnegie, and others, Leadership for Success provides a basic framework to help the unsure or unconfident leader to get on their feet quickly. For that reason, this book is a worthy addition to a shelf of well-thumbed self-improvement books. Even readers who’ve never picked up a self-help book are bound to find themselves sitting taller and realizing that there are ways to achieve their goals.

Katerie Prior