ForeWord Reviews

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White Witch Blue Lady

A Novel of Parapsychological Suspense

Foreword Review — Nov / Dec 2001

The author weaves a splendid tale of mystery shrouded in atmosphere with ample twists and foreshadowing. Nia Littlefield has experienced “visions” all her life, and has ignored them until she and her husband purchase an historic inn on the California coast south of San Francisco. Then the visions intensify until she can no longer disregard them. When an accident strikes her family, Nia blames herself for not foreseeing the danger and preventing the tragedy.

A drifter moves into Nia’s life, and the visions return, with her half sister’s children at their nucleus. As if the visions weren’t enough, Nia also has to deal with recurring uninvited visits by an aged woman who is convinced that “the Blue Lady” haunts Nia’s attic. When they first meet, the woman says, “Forgive my stares, dear, but you look enough like her to be twins.” Nia asks whom she means, and the woman replies, “The ghost, dear.” Nia doesn’t believe in ghosts and pays the woman little attention, until the Blue Lady appears in her visions.

Finally, Nia has a vision of her nephew Tommy and a van, and it becomes reality, but the kidnapping attempt is thwarted. When visions of her niece and a strange woman plague her, Nia struggles unsuccessfully to interpret their meaning. Then Tommy is again taken from his home, and Nia is convinced that she doesn’t have the power to change the future that she has foreseen.

Holloway skillfully sets all the hooks: Who took Tommy? Is he alive or dead? What does the Blue Lady have to do with Tommy’s future? Will Nia be able to use her visions to help find the boy? This believable tale of the paranormal leaves the reader anticipating the next book.

Ann Newman