ForeWord Reviews

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Your Power to Create

From Wishful Thinking to True Manifestation

Foreword Review

“No one ever applied the power to create to the soul,” according to bestselling author Caroline Myss (Anatomy of the Spirit, Why People Don’t Heal, Sacred Contracts, Entering the Castle) on this CD. Myss underscores the dangers of using divine creative power to manifest (bring into being by focusing one’s energies of attraction and intention) for greedy reasons.

Myss is trained in intuitive medicine (seeing illnesses as energies within the body), energy healing, and principles of consciousness. She shares personal perspectives on discipline and “the right use of the soul” for defining life purpose, recounting how she had to overcome warnings that she was doing something dangerous in living out this commitment to trusting her spiritual, inner perspective above all.

According to Myss, creating our lives, health, and relationships requires commitment—far more than the equivalent of the Christmas wish list. Such facile, self-serving motivations, along with lack of discipline and “backbone,” are covered at the beginning of disc one, as reasons for people’s lack of success with, for example, healing their bodies. The power to create is too often trivialized and ritualized says Myss. While she affirms this ability as among the most powerful available, it’s buried under layers of oversimplified misunderstandings that she unpacks.

Offering a novel historical perspective, Myss identifies the seemingly sudden shift in attitude that, “We create our reality,” tracing the shift to a spiritual balancing that occurred as a result of splitting of the atom to make nuclear bombs, “to destroy life.” In response to that, a “flood of light came gushing in. The life pendulum had to balance the thirst for death,” she observes, implying that today’s global mystics are the light keepers.

From this perspective, Myss builds her explanations around the resulting cultural zeitgeist—by decade—using these “creative cycles: Revolution (the ’60s), Involution (the ’70s), Narcissism (the ’80s), Evolution, and Revelation.” As the process unfolded in society, the focus on “stuff” instead of spirit stunted the growth in consciousness. “We’re still stuck in the stuff-narcissism of the 1980s,” she observes.

On disc two, Myss shifts away from the shadow side to what she terms mystical narcissism—defined as “knowing who you are with God” without needing outside validation. She outlines what is required to complete the creation cycle, individually and societally, emphasizing the importance of putting into language specifically what is wanted. This inevitably draws out the inner saboteur. She advises listeners how to defuse that habitual saboteur to heed the call of the soul. Hearing and trusting that inner voice, then taking action, is saying yes to soul guidance, thus shifting the internal compass of life in cooperation with the divine, according to Myss.

Myss proclaims this the time of global mystics. “Your power to create is your power to respond to the hand of heaven…to direct the whole global village soul to channel light and grace on this earth as devotion.” Myss is a contemporary mystic speaking powerful words for those aiming to manifest a more compassionate reality. It is not for the faint of heart. Highly recommended.