Foreword Reviews

What the Pet Food Industry Is Not Telling You

Developing Good Practices for a Healthier Dog

Clarion Rating: 3 out of 5

What the Pet Food Industry Is Not Telling You is a passionate self-help manual for pet owners who want to transition their dogs to healthier eating.

Drawing from personal experience, Stephanie Krol’s What the Pet Food Industry Is Not Telling You is a self-help manual for dog owners seeking better lifestyles for their canine companions.

After her Jack Russel Terrier was given a few months to live, Krol felt desperate. She set out to find some way to save him, even if the veterinarians said that doing so was impossible. She credits what she discovered with preserving her dog’s life. This book aims to share that knowledge with other dog owners, too. In the process, it often references Krol’s dog’s success story, but also the pain that she saw him go through before his transition to the book’s plan.

The book advocates for a single category rotational feeding plan, used to prevent different food groups from meeting in a dog’s single chamber stomach. It also encourages pet owners to monitor their dogs’ fat intakes. Drawing similarities between today’s dogs and their wolf ancestors, it argues that separated meals of raw meat and bone, and vegetables and fruits, are much more in line with a dog’s natural needs than marketed foods and supplements are.

The book strikes a critical but respectful tone, criticizing common veterinary and dog owner practices like vaccinations and dry food diets. Though it concedes that many veterinarians are intelligent and care about their canine patients, it decries that they still encourage the practices that it deems harmful. It credits such intransigence with lack of open dialogue about the alternatives, and it warns that veterinarians may not be supportive of owners deciding to take less traditional approaches. The alternatives it names include holistic and Chinese medicine veterinarians.

Still, though the book makes a bevy of scientific and medical claims, it is short on credible sources. Those sources that are named often come without dates and other critical information, making them difficult to independently verify. Statements like “I believe” and “it stands to reason” are made in relation to the book’s scientific claims, casting additional doubt on their legitimacy. And there are problematic citations, too, that rely on a seller’s view of their own products. Further, the book’s claims and anecdotes repeat. And while some applications for dog owners are hinted at in the body of the text, it is not until the book’s later chapters that concrete steps are shared, including food measurements that take into account a dog’s body weight.

What the Pet Food Industry Is Not Telling You is a passionate self-help manual for pet owners who want to transition their dogs to healthier eating.

Reviewed by Vivian Turnbull

Disclosure: This article is not an endorsement, but a review. The publisher of this book provided free copies of the book and paid a small fee to have their book reviewed by a professional reviewer. Foreword Reviews and Clarion Reviews make no guarantee that the publisher will receive a positive review. Foreword Magazine, Inc. is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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