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What is God's Secret Plan in Revelation Chapter 10?

Clarion Review (2 Stars)

In What is God’s Secret Plan in Revelation Chapter 10?, Peter Jolie offers a mix of sources for interpreting Chapter 10 of the book of Revelation in the Bible. His goal is twofold: to raise awareness about coming events and to exhort readers to accept Jesus as their savior so that they are on the right side of things when these events come to pass.

Jolie suggests that the events he describes and his interpretation of them make “a great subject for debate,” and he is correct. While he affirms his Catholic upbringing and beliefs, his take on the events portrayed in Revelation is quite different from traditional Catholic teaching and that of Protestant denominations as well; for example, he envisions the eventual merging of Christ’s followers under the leadership of an expanded Catholic church.

Jolie’s ideas appear to be a combination of Catholic and evangelical Christian teachings mixed with a rudimentary knowledge of the theory of evolution, conjectures about the Mayan calendar, the ruminations of conspiracy theorists and television evangelists, and personal reflection. The results are interesting, if somewhat confusing.

The author makes much of a dream he had in which a Christmas candy cane had sat untouched for so long that a cobweb had formed around it. He couples that image with the scroll in Revelation 10:10, which, it is written, will be “as sweet as honey in your mouth” but “will turn sour in your stomach.” The candy cane with the cobweb, he writes, is a symbol of the Catholic church—something once good but now well past its “best use date.”

“I believe that God’s secret plan in Revelation Chapter 10 is about Christ bringing back what Adam has taken away,” writes Jolie, who believes that Christ’s presence is being made known no longer through the Catholic church but instead through the ministries of evangelical Pentecostal preacher and healer Benny Hinn. Jolie equates the United Nations with “the beast” of Revelation, and he likens “the false prophet” to a “Christian” US president who holds power given to him by the devil in order to rule the world. Under this ruler, those who have not received the “mark of the beast” will have to build a new civilization under the leadership of “Peter the Baptist,” who will be pope.

Jolie’s book is marred by errors in grammar and word usage. And on the cover, the overabundance of words and various type sizes and treatments (some words in italics, some in all caps) create visual clutter. The book also lacks credible references beyond the 1949 edition of Richards Topical Encyclopedia.

With his elaboration of scripture passages, the majority of them from Genesis and Revelation, Jolie does indeed provided some interesting topics for debate. He declares that the results of his study offer “the accurate truth about how the earth and its life was [sic] created,” the reason for the creation of Adam and Eve, and why his interpretations are “a great message of hope to those who believe.”

Kristine Morris