ForeWord Reviews

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Turning the Feather Around

My Life in Art

Foreword Review — May / June 1998

Turning the Feather Around: My Life in Art is a surprising read, not only for the facts that lie in George Morrison’s life story, but also how Margot Fortuna to Galt skillfully crafted the 30 or so interviews with Morrison and his wife, Hazel Belvo. Morrison’s life journey - beginning in a small Ojibway community and coursing through Europe, the artist havens of Greenwich Village and Province town, and finally home again to his Ojibway roots - is an entertaining read in the richest sense of Native American oral tradition. As Galt explains: “This book does not pretend to be the last word on George Morrison’s life and art. But it is his word.”

For those interested in the development of American culture, this book is important, in part, because of Morrison’s place in history as a highly skilled artist who, in his words, “happens to be an Indian.” It is a personal and compelling look into the life of a man who lived through and was involved in some of our century’s most important developments in the visual arts. The book itself is well put together by the Minnesota Historical Society Press (all the plates are properly placed in the text).

A remarkable achievement, Turning the Feather Around: My Life in Art is certain to captivate art historians, readers of biographies or more casual readers who are simply looking for a good summer read.

John Bracey