ForeWord Reviews

great books independent voices

The Seon Way to Enlightenment

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

Suroso Mun is a South Korean spiritual teacher with meditation centers in several countries. She has written more than twenty books, some of which have been translated into English. The Seon Way to Enlightenment chronicles Suroso Mun’s arduous, years-long commitment to meditation and breathing practice, with logic-defying forays into the realms of heaven and earth energies. She progressed with the celestial help of several spirit teachers who visited her regularly to both provide encouragement and tweak her practice. Through their grace and coupled with her courageous and uninhibited determination to transcend the fragile and multitudinous layers of the mind, Suroso Mun “met her original nature” and became enlightened.

Easy to read question-and-answer style interactions with Suroso Mun’s spirit teachers make up the bulk of The Seon Way to Enlightenment. The teachers share dozens of tangible, important, and authentic jewels for using in one’s meditation, health practices, and interactions with others. For example, in response to Suroso Mun’s question, “What is the most important thing while a person lives his life?” Her spirit teacher advised that,”It is thinking. Depending on how a person thinks about things in his life, the direction of his life differs. Thought is that which affects one’s life most decisively; depending on how one thinks, this world can be either the most wearisome place or the best place to live.”

Suroso Mun even delves into frank questions about the efficacy of sexual relations on the spiritual path and how to cope with her husband’s drinking problem.

Suroso Mun writes with a gentle guilelessness that makes her travels through the realms of heaven and beyond effortlessly believable. She traveled on a variety of space ships, and spoke with wise and kind-looking residents of extraordinary planets with advanced cultures, where beings lived for 30,000 years and visited Earth for observation and study. These souls were delightfully forthcoming in conversations with Suroso Mun about the state of both humans and beings from other dimensions, as well as other tremendously interesting and profound subjects.

Suroso Mun’s quixotically successful road to enlightenment is well documented in The Seon Way to Enlightenment. While little was lost in translation, the abundance of many confusing Korean words and technical energy-related concepts adds a distinct heaviness to the text. Those with an interest in serious spiritual practice with a Korean flavor, not to mention Chinese medicine and extraterrestrials, will find the book to be an excellent read.

Patty Sutherland