ForeWord Reviews

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Once Future Past

The Awakening

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

What would your life be like if you could truly awaken to the possibilities inherent within your DNA? If you could commune with the mentors of the human race and engage in psychic battle with its enemies? If you could see auras, heal energy wounds, and communicate without speech? These are only a few of the tantalizing questions raised in this page-turner of a science fiction debut.

Readers who enjoy intellectual brain-teasers will find themselves driving through this book with one foot on the gas pedal and one foot on the brake. The non-stop action and flawless pacing urge readers forward; at the same time, the questions raised are too interesting to simply speed on by. Readers may, in fact, find themselves debating the book’s “What ifs” with their nearest and dearest.

When techno-scientist Rob begins having strange dreams, he instinctively keeps them from his wife, Leigh. But she too has been having similarly realistic dreams—and for much longer than he has. Soon Rob, Leigh, and their friends are swept up in a struggle between two alien races: the human-friendly K’Ta, and their powerful foes, the P’rtha. If Rob and Leigh can’t work together to awaken their potential, all humanity could be destroyed.

When a dreaming Rob enters a cave, he finds an aged and lined dark-brown leather book, which automatically opens to a page that provides a partial explanation:

“Understand this, for it is the most important lesson, now that you are here. You are of the K’Ta; our history is long and ancient—you must learn from it. The first lesson will start with the end, and your beginning. Humanity is our sons and our daughters, and we will expect much of you.”

Once Future Past: The Awakening, is the first in a five-book series by D.L. Robinson. The author served in the US Navy and currently tutors students in math, English, and history. Despite some first-novel flaws, including a flashback in the story’s beginning that is poorly delineated, some stiff dialogue, proofing errors, and an unintended switch in perspective during one of Rob’s experiences with the K’ta, this is an intriguing and well-written start to a unique new series.