ForeWord Reviews

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"No, It's Not Hot In Here"

A Husband?s Guide to Understanding Menopause

Foreword Review — Mar / Apr 1999

Who would guess—outside of the publishing industry—that there are some fifty books for the general reader on menopause? Besides having a clever title, this one is perhaps unique in bringing the perspective of an enlightened male. Roth, an Olympic swimming champion and Stanford graduate, has worked in management, ranching and as a “Seven Habits” (Steven Covey) seminar leader. He is still happily married after accompanying his wife through a long and difficult menopause.

“I know that many people have a tough time talking about sex, but when your wife is going through menopause it’s a good idea. Find out what is right for her. Men often assume they know, but usually we don’t have a clue. Try to understand before you jump to any conclusions. That’s good generic advice that may have benefits way beyond your menopausal sex education.” Roth has a nice freestyle that moves the reader smoothly through these troubled waters—and this is a distance swim, not a sprint.

The fourteen chapters cover the biology, psychology, “medicalization of menopause”—with some good insights on the pressures to use hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and alternatives thereto—and views from the man’s and the woman’s perspective. Roth has done his homework, as shown by a rich bibliography and a resource list of organizations and websites.

His explanations of physiology are not quite at the level of the psychology, but the former are well covered in other books. One major fault is the implication that chiropractors are physicians. Roth carefully weighs the merits of HRT, noting that Premarin is the top-selling drug in the U.S. today. He is open to natural hormones, alternative medicine, naturopathy and chiropractic, but strongly recommends Dr. Susan Love’s Hormone Book (1997).

No, It’s Not Hot In Here will appeal to—and help—both men and women. Roth leaves room for individual differences; indeed, he warns against overgeneralizing. As the quote above demonstrates, his plainspoken sensibility will benefit readers in all stages of life. This book has lasting value.