ForeWord Reviews

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Nature's Diet

Heal Your Body and Stay Healthy by Following Nature's Simple 21-Day Plan

Foreword Review

“The natural healing force within each of us is the greatest force in getting well,” said Hippocrates, long considered the Father of Medicine. Yet few people consider how the small choices they make each day strengthen or weaken their bodies’ healthy function. Just maybe, better health can start right in the grocery aisle, using nature as a guide.

According to naturopathic doctor Andrew Iverson in his book Nature’s Diet, everyone can find better health and even healing by looking to Mother Nature. For thousands of years, man has survived and thrived without the benefits of modern medicine. Nature provides exactly what we need in the forms we need. While allopathic medicine has its place, Iverson argues that our modern lifestyle keeps us from living and eating the way our bodies were designed. With a few changes, he says, we can find greater wellbeing.

The book presents a twenty-one-day plan for making healthy daily changes. Each day brings a single challenge, ranging from simple—eating whole foods—to more complex, such as detoxifying one’s body. Each day clearly explains the change’s health benefits and why it fits with and improves the body’s intended function. For example, Iverson explains that foods grow at the times they do, in the places they do, and in the form they do for a reason, it’s what people and animals in that particular region need to thrive.

Iverson’s advice is straightforward. Regarding one reason why half one’s diet should be vegetables, he says, “When that [natural vegetable] fiber is chewed and swallowed, it acts like a net of sponges which prevent the not-so-good things in your diet from being absorbed.” His advice also stays practical, covering everything from meal planning and cooking to medications, vitamins, and healthy hygiene.

This book is not stuffy, clinical, or guilt-laden. The tone remains friendly, realistic, and understanding. Iverson gently invites readers to make the changes and discover the vibrant life they’d been missing. Not for those adamantly opposed to naturopathic medicine or a more organic lifestyle, this book’s readers must be open to significant life changes. And while the fearless can dive right in, the timid can also benefit from the book by moving step by step toward potential greater well-being. Iverson competently reassures readers that this lifestyle isn’t as out there as it may seem, and it isn’t just for hippies anymore.

Diane Gardner