ForeWord Reviews

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May God Bless You: Be

Clarion Review (2 Stars)

May God Bless You, by Dr. Joel Jimenez, is a large conglomeration of acrostics, quips, jokes, medical advice, quotations, and Internet finds. It is Jimenez’s desire to impart a blessing through any means possible to believers and nonbelievers alike. Those undaunted by this monstrous collection of eclectic information may be able to glean a tidbit of enjoyment or value.

A good portion of the book focuses on acrostics of scriptural passages, hymns, prayers, and poems. Lovers of biblical codes and such might enjoy this section. The reader will find himself disappointed if seeking a new, inspired interpretation of scripture. The acrostics basically summarize the same passage already digested in the reading, thus giving no new insight into the reading.

Jimenez’s chapter “Laughter Is the Best Medicine” might more appropriately summarize the last portion of the book. The reader would do well to heed the author’s introductory instructions to ingest the book in small quantities at a time. For the reader with the determination and a strong will to endure, some good laughs will inevitably be found. In the second half of the book, Jimenez includes collected writings, jokes, quotations, and interviews from both known and unknown sources.

The book covers such subjects as medical advice, becoming an American citizen, taking personal photos of possible auras, and family mementos. Internet findings of both known and unknown sources are used widely throughout this section, with some scattered acrostics thrown in as well.

For joke lovers, some of this section might prove fruitful if one doesn’t mind old jokes. The jokes range from secular to religious, including humor involving marriage, gender, children, and aging. Golf lovers may also enjoy this section; it is clear Jimenez is a fan. His own personal wish list may leave the reader questioning the author’s motives, appreciating his refreshing candor, or thinking he’s a little crazy … the gamut of emotions may vary widely.

It is apparent that Jimenez has a love of both God and humor. However, his attempt to impart a blessing to the reader does not deliver in May God Bless You. The varied, disjointed sections of this book and the excessive Internet findings leave the reader frustrated, sadly lost in the chaos, and never quite hearing Jimenez’s voice.

Robin Phillips