ForeWord Reviews

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It's Your Health

Clarion Review (5 Stars)

“Arrogance is not limited to just politicians,” warns Dr. Robert D’Antonio. “Physicians are, believe it or not, human.”

Despite these and many other memorable quips, It’s Your Health is not meant to be funny or entertaining, yet at times it manages a little of both. The book is a simple, straightforward primer on what everyone needs to know about medical care in modern America.

Easily read in one or two sittings, the text aims to guide people to meet the prerequisites the author believes are necessary to live a long and healthy life. “Times have changed and in a big way,” cautions D’Antonio, one of three brothers who became doctors. In his opinion, everyone who does not understand their options, rights, and responsibilities is likely to end up dead, bankrupt, or, at the very least, without proper health care. “Life is too short to allow for poor health,” he preaches.

Much of the book is common sense on how to choose, talk with, and listen to a doctor. “Do not let yourself be bullied,” warns D’Antonio. He urges readers to shop around and ask questions because not all doctors, hospitals, or health insurance providers “are created equal.” Insurance companies provide choices and advice, and patients have the “right to challenge” that advice. Only a well-informed patient can understand and take advantage of the benefits that modern health care in America can provide.

D’Antonio writes in a clear, no-nonsense voice that any teen or adult should understand. This clarity helps make sense of what the author admits is a dizzying array of acronyms and choices in the health insurance, health care, Medicare, and Medicaid industries. While he does not go into great detail, D’Antonio covers the basics of each, giving the reader a solid starting point.

This instructional booklet, a spare forty-nine pages of text and another forty of appendices consisting mostly of addresses and sample medical forms, should be mandatory reading for high school students and adults. It should also be available in every pharmacy, doctor’s office, and hospital waiting room in the country. The information offered within is invaluable.

Mark G. McLaughlin