ForeWord Reviews

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Health Revolution

Holistic Balance

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

Millions of people suffer from chronic pain. The overwhelmingly accepted approach is to treat such pain with medication, at least in Western medicine. Dr. Kuny Suzuki believes this is wrong for two key reasons. First, he says, relieving the pain does not cure the underlying disease, or uncover the root cause of the pain. Second, drugs can sometimes be more harmful than the pain itself.

Suzuki’s claims are believable because he has first-hand knowledge of serious, chronic pain. He was eighteen years old when he was diagnosed with multiple articular rheumatism (lupus). He was given drugs to ease his pain, in particular, cortisone injections. Eventually, Suzuki contracted as many as seventeen different disorders or diseases which, he believed, were largely the result of the cortisone treatments. It took him ten years to overcome his pain.

This life-changing experience led Suzuki to pursue medicine with the intent of becoming a pain-relieving specialist. He recognized, however, that traditional Western medicine was not the answer. Instead, he began to study Oriental medicine and developed his own brand of pain treatment, which he named “Holistic Balance Therapy.”

In his book, Suzuki takes the reader on a brief autobiographical journey, also relating an intriguing story about how his father overcame illness through his own healing power. These stories personalize the real objective of the book, which is to convey the theory and some of the practices of Holistic Balance Therapy.

Health Revolution is a bit too technical at times, and it could benefit from better proofreading, but these factors do not detract from the value of the content. Suzuki provides a good basis for explaining the primary differences between Western and Oriental medicine. He does a solid job of discussing the three key areas that affect one’s well-being—the external, internal, and spiritual elements—and how to keep them in balance. He provides readers with specific techniques, such as advanced finger acupressure, designed to relieve pain.

Suzuki’s advice is based on his experience helping over 100,000 patients deal with pain at the Oriental Medicine Pain Clinic, which he founded some thirty years ago. As a result, Health Revolution is as much the culmination of his successful practice as it is a book about an alternative method of treating pain.

Health Revolution is interesting and eye-opening, made all the more relevant by the current national debate over health care reform. It is a book well worth reading for anyone who endures chronic pain, or for anyone whose family or friends are suffering from pain.

Nancy Leake