ForeWord Reviews

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Green 61

Foreword Review

A horrific boating accident kills a man in a pleasure boat and two children in a kayak. The children’s father watched them die, and he believes that the driver of the Pacer Marine test boat, which struck the other two craft at a high speed, is solely to blame; the test boat driver was distracted and negligently left the Intracoastal Waterway. Yet, justice eludes the grieving father when the test boat driver commits perjury and is absolved by the authorities. The father turns to a bright young attorney to pursue a civil suit against Pacer Marine.

Anderson Parker was recently fired by Justin Cartwright II, the most ruthless, unscrupulous, and successful defense attorney in South Florida. Anderson is as honest and courteous as Cartwright is unethical and nasty. Cartwright will do anything to win a case, including doctoring evidence, for a price—his exorbitant hourly fee. He is proud of his ability to win at all costs. “Nobody can put lipstick on a pig like I can,” he chortles.

When Anderson learns that his former boss has been retained to represent Pacer Marine, his promise to zealously represent his client becomes personal. He wants desperately to win the case and beat the man who humiliated him, but he doesn’t know just how underhanded Cartwright will become to teach his former employee a lesson in courtroom brawling. Cartwright was the one who convinced the test boat driver to lie, and he isn’t finished concealing evidence. He has threatened the only witness to the crash—an eleven-year-old girl—to make her stay quiet. Anderson does not know it, but this girl holds the key to his winning at trial. She alone can verify that the test boat driver did not have the right of way and actually hit the boats outside of the buoy that marks the Intracoastal Waterway near the point of impact—Green Marker 61.

Anderson’s attempts to outwit the crafty Cartwright, coupled with the legal maneuverings of these skilled adversaries, create suspense right until the very end of this brilliantly staged courtroom drama.

The author, a successful trial attorney, has an incredible legal pedigree. His grandfather (whose namesake Davis is) was president of the American Bar Association and the American College of Trial Lawyers; his father was a judge and a law school professor; his brother is a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Davis has previously written a manual to guide trial lawyers; this is his first novel. His writing skills are as accomplished as his professional achievements: he has created an absorbing legal drama of which Scott Turow or John Grisham would be proud. His ability to create compelling characters and “real world” legal scenarios is outstanding.

Anyone who enjoys legal thrillers will love this book and will eagerly await the sequel, which is teased at the end.

Alan J. Couture