ForeWord Reviews

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Careerpreneurs

Lessons from Leading Women Entrepreneurs on Building a Career Without Boundaries

Foreword Review — Sept / Oct 2000

Women-owned businesses have doubled in the last twelve years to more than 9.1 million, 38 percent of all firms in the United States…Women owners generate $3.6 trillion in sales yearly.

Careerpreneurs is for and about women who take control of their own careers and explore the business world with newfound individualism. Over 100 women entrepreneurs who have been recognized for their achievements are profiled in this book. They share their success stories and candidly discuss their motivations for choosing business ownership. One woman who founded a subsidiary of a large biochemical company and grew sales from $200,000 to $4 million in four years realized she probably had what it would take to successfully run her own company.

Another left the management ranks of a major clothing manufacturer to start her own sportswear company, earning more than a million dollars the first year.

The book discusses various reasons women seek entrepreneurial careers, such as opportunities for more challenge, higher salaries, and freedom from corporate glass ceilings, and points out that increasing numbers of women are leaving corporate jobs to start their own businesses. It illustrates how women have leveraged their existing skills into new business opportunities, many drawing on experience gained from years of work in a corporate environment.

The book opens with a description of the shift in traditional “organization-based” professional employment to a more “individual-based” entrepreneurial career. The current statistics on women in the workplace presented here support the theory that the trend is moving away from continuing corporate loyalty, and suggests that savvy women today keep all of their career options open. In addition to the entrepreneurs who start their own businesses, the book also discusses intrapreneurs who create entrepreneurial environments within their organizations, as well as copreneurs, who have dual-careers.

Careerpreneurs is a good mix of career advice and testimonials, offering useful strategies, tips, and exercises to help women explore their own possibilities. What makes this book particularly interesting is that not all of the women profiled knew from the start that they would have entrepreneurial careers. This may provide the inspiration or encouragement for readers considering a change in their own careers.

Cindy Patuszynski